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Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases attenuates brain damage in experimental meningococcal meningitis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases attenuates brain damage in experimental meningococcal meningitis
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12879-014-0726-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susanna Ricci, Denis Grandgirard, Michael Wenzel, Tiziana Braccini, Paola Salvatore, Marco R Oggioni, Stephen L Leib, Uwe Koedel

Abstract

BackgroundApproximately 7% of survivors from meningococcal meningitis (MM) suffer from neurological sequelae due to brain damage in the course of meningitis. The present study focuses on the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in a novel mouse model of MM-induced brain damage.MethodsThe model is based on intracisternal infection of BALB/c mice with a serogroup C Neisseria meningitidis strain. Mice were infected with meningococci and randomised for treatment with the MMP inhibitor batimastat (BB-94) or vehicle. Animal survival, brain injury and host-response biomarkers were assessed 48 h after meningococcal challenge.ResultsMice that received BB-94 presented significantly diminished MMP-9 levels (p¿<¿0.01), intracerebral bleeding (p¿<¿0.01), and blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown (p¿<¿0.05) in comparison with untreated animals. In mice suffering from MM, the amount of MMP-9 measured by zymography significantly correlated with both intracerebral haemorrhage (p¿<¿0.01) and BBB disruption (p¿<¿0.05).ConclusionsMMPs significantly contribute to brain damage associated with experimental MM. Inhibition of MMPs reduces intracranial complications in mice suffering from MM, representing a potential adjuvant strategy in MM post-infection sequelae.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 4%
Switzerland 1 4%
Unknown 21 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 22%
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Postgraduate 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 39%
Neuroscience 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,826,972
of 6,420,515 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,463
of 2,992 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,919
of 194,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#75
of 185 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,420,515 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,992 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,206 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 185 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.