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An fMRI study of facial emotion processing in children and adolescents with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, January 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

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6 tweeters
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4 Facebook pages

Citations

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43 Dimensions

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72 Mendeley
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Title
An fMRI study of facial emotion processing in children and adolescents with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome
Published in
Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/1866-1955-7-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rayna Azuma, Quinton Deeley, Linda E Campbell, Eileen M Daly, Vincent Giampietro, Michael J Brammer, Kieran C Murphy, Declan GM Murphy

Abstract

22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, velo-cardio-facial syndrome [VCFS]) is a genetic disorder associated with interstitial deletions of chromosome 22q11.2. In addition to high rates of neuropsychiatric disorders, children with 22q11DS have impairments of face processing, as well as IQ-independent deficits in visuoperceptual function and social and abstract reasoning. These face-processing deficits may contribute to the social impairments of 22q11DS. However, their neurobiological basis is poorly understood. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine neural responses when children with 22q11DS (aged 9-17 years) and healthy controls (aged 8-17 years) incidentally processed neutral expressions and mild (50%) and intense (100%) expressions of fear and disgust. We included 28 right-handed children and adolescents: 14 with 22q11DS and 14 healthy (including nine siblings) controls. Within groups, contrasts showed that individuals significantly activated 'face responsive' areas when viewing neutral faces, including fusiform-extrastriate cortices. Further, within both groups, there was a significant positive linear trend in activation of fusiform-extrastriate cortices and cerebellum to increasing intensities of fear. There were, however, also between-group differences. Children with 22q11DS generally showed reduced activity as compared to controls in brain regions involved in social cognition and emotion processing across emotion types and intensities, including fusiform-extrastriate cortices, anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann area (BA) 24/32), and superomedial prefrontal cortices (BA 6). Also, an exploratory correlation analysis showed that within 22q11DS children reduced activation was associated with behavioural impairment-social difficulties (measured using the Total Difficulties Score from the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire [SDQ]) were significantly negatively correlated with brain activity during fear and disgust processing (respectively) in the left precentral gyrus (BA 4) and in the left fusiform gyrus (FG, BA 19), right lingual gyrus (BA 18), and bilateral cerebellum. Regions involved in face processing, including fusiform-extrastriate cortices, anterior cingulate gyri, and superomedial prefrontal cortices (BA 6), are activated by facial expressions of fearful, disgusted, and neutral expressions in children with 22q11DS but generally to a lesser degree than in controls. Hypoactivation in these regions may partly explain the social impairments of children with 22q11DS.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 71 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 17%
Researcher 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 10%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 11 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 22%
Neuroscience 11 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 10%
Arts and Humanities 3 4%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 15 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2016.
All research outputs
#3,369,375
of 12,440,542 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#124
of 265 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,210
of 279,482 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#10
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,440,542 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 265 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,482 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.