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Mycoplasma pneumoniae as a causative agent of community-acquired pneumonia in children: clinical features and laboratory diagnosis

Overview of attention for article published in Italian Journal of Pediatrics, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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80 Dimensions

Readers on

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68 Mendeley
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Title
Mycoplasma pneumoniae as a causative agent of community-acquired pneumonia in children: clinical features and laboratory diagnosis
Published in
Italian Journal of Pediatrics, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13052-014-0104-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Biljana Medjo, Marina Atanaskovic-Markovic, Snezana Radic, Dimitrije Nikolic, Marija Lukac, Slobodanka Djukic

Abstract

Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in children with CAP and find clinical, radiological and laboratory features helpful to diagnose Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. Furthermore, we evaluated the value of serology, real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and culture for the accurate diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.MethodsThe study included 166 children aged between 1 and 15 years with radiologically confirmed pneumonia. Throat swab specimens were cultured and assessed by RT-PCR for the presence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Mycoplasma pneumoniae-specific IgM and IgG antibodies were determined using ELISA in paired sera.Results Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia was diagnosed in 14.5% CAP cases. Cough (p=0.029), headache (p=0.001) and wheezing (p=0.036) were more frequent in children with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia compared to children with pneumonia caused by other pathogens. Logistic regression analysis showed that headache (odds ratio [OR] =36.077, p=0.001) and wheezing (OR=5.681, p=0.003) were significantly associated with MP pneumonia. Neither radiological findings, nor common laboratory parameters distinguished Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in children with CAP. Using IgG serology in paired sera as the gold standard, we found that sensitivity of IgM serology, RT-PCR and culture was equal (81.82%), while specificity values were 100%, 98.6% and 100% respectively. We observed that combination of IgM detection in acute-phase serum and RT-PCR was positive for 91.7% of cases with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.ConclusionsThere are no characteristic radiological findings, or routine laboratory tests that would distinguish CAP caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae from other CAP. It was found that clinical features such as headache and wheezing are indicative for Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Furthermore, it was found that during the acute phase of disease, detection of IgM antibodies in combination with RT-PCR allows for precise and reliable diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections in children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 1%
Unknown 67 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Other 5 7%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 20 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 25 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2018.
All research outputs
#4,198,035
of 22,914,829 outputs
Outputs from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#151
of 945 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,227
of 353,868 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#5
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,914,829 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 945 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 353,868 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.