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Living with ongoing whiplash associated disorders: a qualitative study of individual perceptions and experiences

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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28 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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83 Mendeley
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Title
Living with ongoing whiplash associated disorders: a qualitative study of individual perceptions and experiences
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1882-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carrie Ritchie, Carolyn Ehrlich, Michele Sterling

Abstract

Whiplash associated disorders (WAD) are the most common non-hospitalised injury resulting from a motor vehicle crash. Approximately 50% of individuals with WAD experience on-going pain and disability. Results from intervention trials for individuals with chronic WAD are equivocal and optimal treatment continues to be a challenge. It may be that traditional quantitative measures included in treatment trials have not captured the full benefits patients experience through participation in an intervention. The aim of the present study was to explore participant subjective experiences and perceptions of living with on-going WAD. Twenty-seven individuals with chronic WAD participated in a one-on-one, semi-structured individual telephone interview. All interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and data were analysed using an inductive thematic analysis process. Two themes emerged that described the experience of living with chronic WAD. First, all participants described navigating the healthcare system after their whiplash injury to help understand their injury and interpret therapeutic recommendations. Participants highlighted the need to 'find the right healthcare practitioner (HCP)' to help with this process. Many participants also described additional complexities in navigating and understanding healthcare incurred by interactions with compensation and funding systems. Second, participants described a journey of realisation, and the trial and error used to establish self-management strategies to both prevent and relieve pain. Participants described trying to understand the impact of their initial injury in relation to the gradual realisation that there may be on-going residual deficit. Seeking information from multiple sources, including personal experience gained through trial and error, was important in the search for acceptable management strategies. Recovery from a whiplash injury is an adaptive process and more than elimination of pain or disability, therefore may be different from common clinical patient reported outcomes. Early identification of patient understandings of pain, expectations of recovery, symptoms and therapy may help merge patient and HCP understandings. Additionally, helping individuals to recognise symptom triggers and develop appropriate strategies to minimise triggers may actively engage patients in their recovery. Finally, acknowledgement and validation of the whiplash injury by HCPs is seen by many as a necessary step in the recovery process.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 19%
Student > Bachelor 11 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Lecturer 5 6%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 27 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 19%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Psychology 3 4%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 30 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2018.
All research outputs
#1,298,829
of 15,922,193 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#275
of 3,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,790
of 409,848 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#37
of 306 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,193 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,079 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 409,848 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 306 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.