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Human resource for health reform in peri-urban areas: a cross-sectional study of the impact of policy interventions on healthcare workers in Epworth, Zimbabwe

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
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Title
Human resource for health reform in peri-urban areas: a cross-sectional study of the impact of policy interventions on healthcare workers in Epworth, Zimbabwe
Published in
Human Resources for Health, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12960-017-0260-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bernard Hope Taderera, Stephen James Heinrich Hendricks, Yogan Pillay

Abstract

The need to understand how healthcare worker reform policy interventions impact health personnel in peri-urban areas is important as it also contributes towards setting of priorities in pursuing the universal health coverage goal of health sector reform. This study explored the impact of post 2008 human resource for health reform policy interventions on healthcare workers in Epworth, a peri-urban community in Harare, Zimbabwe, and the implications towards health sector reform policy in peri-urban areas. The study design was exploratory and cross-sectional and involved the use of qualitative and quantitative methods in data collection, presentation, and analysis. A qualitative study in which data were collected through a documentary search, five key informant interviews, seven in-depth interviews, and five focus group discussions was carried out first. This was followed by a quantitative study in which data were collected through a documentary search and 87 semi-structured sample interviews with healthcare workers. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically whilst descriptive statistics were used to examine quantitative data. All data were integrated during analysis to ensure comprehensive, reliable, and valid analysis of the dataset. Three main factors were identified to help interpret findings. The first main factor consisted policy result areas that impacted most successfully on healthcare workers. These included the deployment of community health workers with the highest correlation of 0.83. Policy result areas in the second main factor included financial incentives with a correlation of 0.79, training and development (0.77), deployment (0.77), and non-financial incentives (0.75). The third factor consisted policy result areas that had the lowest satisfaction amongst healthcare workers in Epworth. These included safety (0.72), equipment and tools of trade (0.72), health welfare (0.65), and salaries (0.55). The deployment of community health volunteers impacted healthcare workers most successfully. This was followed by salary top-up allowances, training, deployment, and non-financial incentives. However, health personnel were least satisfied with their salaries. This had negative implications towards health sector reform interventions in Epworth peri-urban community between 2009 and 2014.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 14%
Researcher 9 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 17 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 13 18%
Social Sciences 10 14%
Business, Management and Accounting 10 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 21 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 December 2017.
All research outputs
#6,317,763
of 20,378,860 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#686
of 1,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,829
of 435,967 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#54
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,378,860 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,066 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 435,967 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.