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Bioinformatically predicted deleterious mutations reveal complementation in the interior spruce hybrid complex

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, December 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

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11 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Bioinformatically predicted deleterious mutations reveal complementation in the interior spruce hybrid complex
Published in
BMC Genomics, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12864-017-4344-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gina L. Conte, Kathryn A. Hodgins, Sam Yeaman, Jon C. Degner, Sally N. Aitken, Loren H. Rieseberg, Michael C. Whitlock

Abstract

Mutation load is expected to be reduced in hybrids via complementation of deleterious alleles. While local adaptation of hybrids confounds phenotypic tests for reduced mutation load, it may be possible to assess variation in load by analyzing the distribution of putatively deleterious alleles. Here, we use this approach in the interior spruce (Picea glauca x P. engelmannii) hybrid complex, a group likely to suffer from high mutation load and in which hybrids exhibit local adaptation to intermediate conditions. We used PROVEAN to bioinformatically predict whether non-synonymous alleles are deleterious, based on conservation of the position and abnormality of the amino acid change. As expected, we found that predicted deleterious alleles were at lower average allele frequencies than alleles not predicted to be deleterious. We were unable to detect a phenotypic effect on juvenile growth rate of the many rare alleles predicted to be deleterious. Both the proportion of alleles predicted to be deleterious and the proportion of loci homozygous for predicted deleterious alleles were higher in P. engelmannii (Engelmann spruce) than in P. glauca (white spruce), due to higher diversity and frequencies of rare alleles in Engelmann. Relative to parental species, the proportion of alleles predicted to be deleterious was intermediate in hybrids, and the proportion of loci homozygous for predicted deleterious alleles was lowest. Given that most deleterious alleles are recessive, this suggests that mutation load is reduced in hybrids due to complementation of deleterious alleles. This effect may enhance the fitness of hybrids.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 23%
Researcher 7 18%
Professor 4 10%
Student > Master 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 28%
Computer Science 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Unknown 8 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,004,082
of 13,153,703 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,576
of 7,744 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,501
of 384,061 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#181
of 816 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,153,703 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,744 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 384,061 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 816 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.