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Blood lipids and lipoproteins in relation to incidence and mortality risks for CVD and cancer in the prospective EPIC–Heidelberg cohort

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, December 2017
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Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

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57 Mendeley
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Title
Blood lipids and lipoproteins in relation to incidence and mortality risks for CVD and cancer in the prospective EPIC–Heidelberg cohort
Published in
BMC Medicine, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12916-017-0976-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Verena Andrea Katzke, Disorn Sookthai, Theron Johnson, Tilman Kühn, Rudolf Kaaks

Abstract

Circulating concentrations of lipid biomarkers are associated with risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The evidence for a relationship with cancer risk, however, is not entirely consistent. This study aims to assess the relationships of total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), apolipoprotein (a) (apo(a)), apoB-100, and lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) with risk of common cancer forms and total cancer mortality in comparison to incidence and mortality of CVD. We selected a case-cohort sample out of the prospective EPIC-Heidelberg study, including a random subcohort (n = 2739), and cases of cancer (n = 1632), cancer mortality (n = 761), CVD (n = 1070), and CVD mortality (n = 381). Concentrations of lipid biomarkers were measured in pre-diagnostic blood samples. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Prentice-weighted Cox regression models. High levels of circulating apoB-100 and TG were inversely associated and high HDL-C levels were positively associated with breast cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quartile (Q4 vs. Q1), HRapoB 0.71, 95% CI 0.52-0.98; HRTG 0.65, 0.46-0.92; and HRHDL 1.39, 1.01-1.93). Higher levels of Lp(a) were associated with an increase in prostate cancer risk (Q4 vs. Q1, HRLp(a) 1.43, 1.02-2.03) and high levels of apo(a) were associated with a decrease in lung cancer risk (Q4 vs. Q1, HRapo(a) 0.52, 0.30-0.91). High TC, HDL-C, apo(a), and Lp(a) levels were associated with a reduction in total cancer mortality (Q4 vs. Q1, HRTC 0.71, 0.54-0.94; HRHDL 0.67, 0.50-0.91; HRapo(a) 0.71, 0.54-0.93; and HRLp(a) 0.74, 0.57-0.98). All lipid biomarkers were associated with risk of myocardial infarction, whereby TC, apoB-100, TG, and Lp(a) were positively and HLD-C and apo(a) inversely associated with risk. Only high levels of TG were associated with an increased risk of stroke. None of the lipids were associated with risk of colorectal cancer and with risk of CVD mortality after multivariable adjustments. This prospective study demonstrates inverse associations of lipid biomarkers with cancer incidence and mortality, with the exception of positive associations of HDL-C and Lp(a) with breast and prostate cancer risk, respectively. Thus, the observed cancer risk pattern clearly differs from the CVD risk pattern.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Researcher 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Master 5 9%
Other 4 7%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 19 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 24 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 December 2020.
All research outputs
#5,250,463
of 19,734,181 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#2,065
of 2,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,775
of 430,584 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#143
of 213 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,734,181 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,923 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.4. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 430,584 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 213 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.