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Molecular identification of Borrelia spirochetes in questing Ixodes ricinus from northwestern Spain

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

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33 tweeters
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4 Facebook pages

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Molecular identification of Borrelia spirochetes in questing Ixodes ricinus from northwestern Spain
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13071-017-2574-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pablo Díaz, Jose Luis Arnal, Susana Remesar, Ana Pérez-Creo, José Manuel Venzal, María Esther Vázquez-López, Alberto Prieto, Gonzalo Fernández, Ceferino Manuel López, Rosario Panadero, Alfredo Benito, Pablo Díez-Baños, Patrocinio Morrondo

Abstract

Ixodes ricinus, the predominant tick species in Europe, can transmit the causative agents of important human diseases such as Lyme borreliosis (LB), caused by Borrelia spirochetes. In northern Spain, LB is considered endemic; recently, a significant increase of the annual incidence of LB was reported in the northwestern (NW) region. In order to provide information on the prevalence of Borrelia spp., pooled and individually free-living I. ricinus from NW Spain were molecularly analyzed. Positive samples were characterized at the fla and Glpq genes and the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer region to identify Borrelia species/genospecies. Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato) (s.l.) individual prevalence and MIR were significantly higher in adult females (32.3 and 16%) than in nymphs (18.8 and 6.2%) and adult males (15.6 and 8.4%). Five Borrelia genospecies belonging to the B. burgdorferi (s.l.) group were identified: B. garinii was predominant, followed by B. valaisiana, B. lusitaniae, B. afzelii and B. burgdorferi (sensu stricto) (s.s.). One species belonging to the tick-borne relapsing fever group (B. miyamotoi) was also found, showing low individual prevalence (1%), positive pool (0.7%) and MIR (0.1%) values. To our knowledge, this is the first citation of B. miyamotoi in free-living ticks from Spain. The significant prevalences of B. burgdorferi (s.l.) genospecies detected in questing ticks from NW Spain are similar to those detected in northern and central European countries and higher to those previously found in Spain. These results together with the high incidence of LB in humans and the high seroprevalence of B. burgdorferi (s.l.) in roe deer shown in other studies reveal that the northwest area is one of the most risky regions for acquiring LB in Spain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 16%
Researcher 7 16%
Other 4 9%
Professor 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 8 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 23%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 9%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 13 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2018.
All research outputs
#1,230,255
of 21,479,159 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#167
of 5,219 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,412
of 442,615 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#14
of 559 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,479,159 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,219 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 442,615 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 559 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.