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Exogenous trehalose improves growth under limiting nitrogen through upregulation of nitrogen metabolism

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Plant Biology, December 2017
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Title
Exogenous trehalose improves growth under limiting nitrogen through upregulation of nitrogen metabolism
Published in
BMC Plant Biology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12870-017-1207-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yingchao Lin, Jie Zhang, Weichang Gao, Yi Chen, Hongxun Li, David W. Lawlor, Matthew J. Paul, Wenjie Pan

Abstract

The trehalose (Tre) pathway has strong effects on growth and development in plants through regulation of carbon metabolism. Altering either Tre or trehalose 6-phosphate (T6P) can improve growth and productivity of plants as observed under different water availability. As yet, there are no reports of the effects of modification of Tre orT6P on plant performance under limiting nutrition. Here we report that nitrogen (N) metabolism is positively affected by exogenous application of Tre in nitrogen-deficient growing conditions. Spraying foliage of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with trehalose partially alleviated symptoms of nitrogen deficiency through upregulation of nitrate and ammonia assimilation and increasing activities of nitrate reductase (NR), glycolate oxidase (GO), glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase (GOGAT) with concomitant changes in ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) concentrations, glutamine and amino acids. Chlorophyll and total nitrogen content of leaves and rates of photosynthesis were increased compared to nitrogen-deficient plants without applied Tre. Total plant biomass accumulation was also higher in Tre -fed nitrogen-deficient plants, with a smaller proportion of dry weight partitioned to roots, compared to nitrogen-deficient plants without applied Tre. Consistent with higher nitrogen assimilation and growth, Tre application reduced foliar starch. Minimal effects of Tre feeding were observed on nitrogen-sufficient plants. The data show, for the first time, significant stimulatory effects of exogenous Tre on nitrogen metabolism and growth in plants growing under deficient nitrogen. Under such adverse conditions metabolism is regulated for survival rather than productivity. Application of Tre can alter this regulation towards maintenance of productive functions under low nitrogen. This has implications for considering approaches to modifying the Tre pathway for to improve crop nitrogen-use efficiency and production.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 24%
Student > Master 7 14%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 15 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 12%
Environmental Science 4 8%
Engineering 3 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 15 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2020.
All research outputs
#15,566,651
of 19,417,097 outputs
Outputs from BMC Plant Biology
#1,705
of 2,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#314,899
of 427,789 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Plant Biology
#96
of 167 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,417,097 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,745 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 167 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.