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The role of HoxA11 and HoxA13 in the evolution of novel fin morphologies in a representative batoid (Leucoraja erinacea)

Overview of attention for article published in EvoDevo, December 2017
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Title
The role of HoxA11 and HoxA13 in the evolution of novel fin morphologies in a representative batoid (Leucoraja erinacea)
Published in
EvoDevo, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13227-017-0088-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shannon N. Barry, Karen D. Crow

Abstract

Batoids exhibit unique body plans with derived fin morphologies, such as the anteriorly expanded pectoral fins that fuse to the head, or distally extended anterior pelvic fin lobes used for a modified swimming technique utilized by skates (Rajidae). The little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), exhibits both of these unique fin morphologies. These fin modifications are not present in a typical shark body plan, and little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying their development. A recent study identified a novel apical ectodermal ridge (AER) associated with the development of the anterior pectoral fin in the little skate, but the role of the posterior HoxA genes was not featured during skate fin development. We present the first evidence for HoxA expression (HoxA11 and HoxA13) in novel AER domains associated with the development of three novel fin morphologies in a representative batoid, L. erinacea. We found HoxA13 expression associated with the recently described novel AER in the anterior pectoral fin, and HoxA11 expression in a novel AER domain in the anterior pelvic fin that we describe here. We find that both HoxA11 and HoxA13 are expressed in claspers, and while HoxA11 is expressed in pelvic fins and claspers, HoxA13 is expressed exclusively in developing claspers of males. Finally, HoxA11 expression is associated with the developing fin rays in paired fins. Overall, these results indicate that the posterior HoxA genes play an important role in the morphological evolution of paired fins in a representative batoid. These data suggest that the batoids utilize a unique Hox code, where the posterior HoxA genes exhibit distinct expression patterns that are likely associated with specification of novel fin morphologies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 27%
Other 3 20%
Student > Master 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Student > Postgraduate 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Environmental Science 1 7%
Neuroscience 1 7%
Design 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2017.
All research outputs
#12,644,467
of 15,922,434 outputs
Outputs from EvoDevo
#248
of 275 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#295,003
of 409,034 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EvoDevo
#21
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,434 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 275 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.