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Co-regulation of transcription by BRG1 and BRM, two mutually exclusive SWI/SNF ATPase subunits

Overview of attention for article published in Epigenetics & Chromatin, December 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
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Title
Co-regulation of transcription by BRG1 and BRM, two mutually exclusive SWI/SNF ATPase subunits
Published in
Epigenetics & Chromatin, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13072-017-0167-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jesse R. Raab, John S. Runge, Camarie C. Spear, Terry Magnuson

Abstract

SWI/SNF is a large heterogeneous multi-subunit chromatin remodeling complex. It consists of multiple sets of mutually exclusive components. Understanding how loss of one sibling of a mutually exclusive pair affects the occupancy and function of the remaining complex is needed to understand how mutations in a particular subunit might affect tumor formation. Recently, we showed that the members of the ARID family of SWI/SNF subunits (ARID1A, ARID1B and ARID2) had complex transcriptional relationships including both antagonism and cooperativity. However, it remains unknown how loss of the catalytic subunit(s) affects the binding and genome-wide occupancy of the remainder complex and how changes in occupancy affect transcriptional output. We addressed this gap by depleting BRG1 and BRM, the two ATPase subunits in SWI/SNF, and characterizing the changes to chromatin occupancy of the remaining subunit and related this to transcription changes induced by loss of the ATPase subunits. We show that depletion of one subunit frequently leads to loss of the remaining subunit. This could cause either positive or negative changes in gene expression. At a subset of sites, the sibling subunit is either retained or gained. Additionally, we show genome-wide that BRG1 and BRM have both cooperative and antagonistic interactions with respect to transcription. Importantly, at genes where BRG1 and BRM antagonize one another we observe a nearly complete rescue of gene expression changes in the combined BRG/BRM double knockdown. This series of experiments demonstrate that mutually exclusive SWI/SNF complexes have heterogeneous functional relationships and highlight the importance of considering the role of the remaining SWI/SNF complexes following loss or depletion of a single subunit.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 23%
Researcher 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 5 8%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 12 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 29 48%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Design 1 2%
Unknown 12 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2018.
All research outputs
#6,893,671
of 21,271,011 outputs
Outputs from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#299
of 545 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,071
of 441,287 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#34
of 62 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,271,011 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 545 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 441,287 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 62 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.