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A cross-sectional study of pain sensitivity, disease-activity assessment, mental health, and fibromyalgia status in rheumatoid arthritis

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, January 2015
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2 tweeters

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58 Dimensions

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82 Mendeley
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Title
A cross-sectional study of pain sensitivity, disease-activity assessment, mental health, and fibromyalgia status in rheumatoid arthritis
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0525-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nalinie Joharatnam, Daniel F McWilliams, Deborah Wilson, Maggie Wheeler, Ira Pande, David A Walsh

Abstract

IntroductionPain remains the most important problem for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Active inflammatory disease contributes to pain, but pain due to non-inflammatory mechanisms can confound the assessment of disease activity. We hypothesise that augmented pain processing, fibromyalgic features, poorer mental health and patient-reported 28 joint disease activity score (DAS28) components are associated in RA.MethodsA total of 50 people with stable, longstanding RA recruited from a rheumatology outpatient clinic were assessed for pain pressure thresholds (PPT) at three separate sites (knee, tibia and sternum), DAS28, fibromyalgia and mental health status. Multivariable analysis was performed to assess the association between PPT and DAS28 components, DAS28-P (the proportion of DAS28 derived from the patient-reported components of visual analogue score and tender joint count) or fibromyalgia status.ResultsMore sensitive PPTs at sites over or distant from joints were each associated with greater reported pain, higher patient-reported DAS28 components and poorer mental health. A high proportion of participants (48%) satisfied classification criteria for fibromyalgia, and fibromyalgia classification or characteristics were each associated with more sensitive PPTs, higher patient-reported DAS28 components and poorer mental health.ConclusionsWidespread sensitivity to pressure-induced pain, a high prevalence of fibromyalgic features, higher patient-reported DAS28 components and poorer mental health are all linked in established RA. The increased sensitivity at non-joint sites (sternum and anterior tibia) as well as over joints indicates that central mechanisms may contribute to pain sensitivity in RA. The contribution of patient reported components to high DAS28 should inform decisions on disease modifying or pain management approaches in the treatment of RA when inflammation may be well-controlled.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 81 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 16%
Student > Master 12 15%
Student > Postgraduate 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Other 19 23%
Unknown 9 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 54%
Psychology 7 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 14 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 January 2015.
All research outputs
#7,706,698
of 12,780,703 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1,390
of 2,084 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,982
of 274,726 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#16
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,780,703 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,084 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,726 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.