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9.4 T small animal MRI using clinical components for direct translational studies

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, December 2017
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1 tweeter

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
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Title
9.4 T small animal MRI using clinical components for direct translational studies
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12967-017-1373-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jörg Felder, A. Avdo Celik, Chang-Hoon Choi, Stefan Schwan, N. Jon Shah

Abstract

Magnetic resonance is a major preclinical and clinical imaging modality ideally suited for longitudinal studies, e.g. in pharmacological developments. The lack of a proven platform that maintains an identical imaging protocol between preclinical and clinical platforms is solved with the construction of an animal scanner based on clinical hard- and software. A small animal magnet and gradient system were connected to a clinical MR system. Several hardware components were either modified or built in-house to achieve compatibility. The clinical software was modified to account for the different field-of-view of a preclinical MR system. The established scanner was evaluated using clinical QA protocols, and platform compatibility for translational research was verified against clinical scanners of different field strength. The constructed animal scanner operates with the majority of clinical imaging sequences. Translational research is greatly facilitated as protocols can be shared between preclinical and clinical platforms. Hence, when maintaining sequences parameters, maximum similarity between pulses played out on a human or an animal system is maintained. Coupling of a small animal magnet with a clinical MR system is a flexible, easy to use way to establish and advance translational imaging capability. It provides cost and labor efficient translational capability as no tedious sequence reprogramming between moieties is required and cross-platform compatibility of sequences facilitates multi-center studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 20%
Researcher 4 20%
Student > Bachelor 3 15%
Other 2 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 10%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 4 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 5 25%
Computer Science 2 10%
Neuroscience 2 10%
Unspecified 1 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 6 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 December 2017.
All research outputs
#7,722,645
of 12,357,782 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1,502
of 2,417 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#195,549
of 350,337 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#49
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,357,782 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,417 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,337 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.