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Bile acids at the cross-roads of gut microbiome–host cardiometabolic interactions

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
14 X users

Citations

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53 Dimensions

Readers on

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91 Mendeley
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Title
Bile acids at the cross-roads of gut microbiome–host cardiometabolic interactions
Published in
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13098-017-0299-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul M. Ryan, Catherine Stanton, Noel M. Caplice

Abstract

While basic and clinical research over the last several decades has recognized a number of modifiable risk factors associated with cardiometabolic disease progression, additional and alternative biological perspectives may offer novel targets for prevention and treatment of this disease set. There is mounting preclinical and emerging clinical evidence indicating that the mass of metabolically diverse microorganisms which inhabit the human gastrointestinal tract may be implicated in initiation and modulation of cardiovascular and metabolic disease outcomes. The following review will discuss this gut microbiome-host metabolism axis and address newly proposed bile-mediated signaling pathways through which dysregulation of this homeostatic axis may influence host cardiovascular risk. With a central focus on the major nuclear and membrane-bound bile acid receptor ligands, we aim to review the putative impact of microbial bile acid modification on several major phenotypes of metabolic syndrome, from obesity to heart failure. Finally, attempting to synthesize several separate but complementary hypotheses, we will review current directions in preclinical and clinical investigation in this evolving field.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 91 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Student > Master 11 12%
Other 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 24 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 7%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 26 29%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,207,704
of 23,015,156 outputs
Outputs from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#68
of 676 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,169
of 441,976 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#3
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,015,156 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 676 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 441,976 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.