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Key stages in mammary gland development: The cues that regulate ductal branching morphogenesis

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, December 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
5 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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262 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
343 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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1 Connotea
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Title
Key stages in mammary gland development: The cues that regulate ductal branching morphogenesis
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, December 2005
DOI 10.1186/bcr1368
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark D Sternlicht

Abstract

Part of how the mammary gland fulfills its function of producing and delivering adequate amounts of milk is by forming an extensive tree-like network of branched ducts from a rudimentary epithelial bud. This process, termed branching morphogenesis, begins in fetal development, pauses after birth, resumes in response to estrogens at puberty, and is refined in response to cyclic ovarian stimulation once the margins of the mammary fat pad are met. Thus it is driven by systemic hormonal stimuli that elicit local paracrine interactions between the developing epithelial ducts and their adjacent embryonic mesenchyme or postnatal stroma. This local cellular cross-talk, in turn, orchestrates the tissue remodeling that ultimately produces a mature ductal tree. Although the precise mechanisms are still unclear, our understanding of branching in the mammary gland and elsewhere is rapidly improving. Moreover, many of these mechanisms are hijacked, bypassed, or corrupted during the development and progression of cancer. Thus a clearer understanding of the underlying endocrine and paracrine pathways that regulate mammary branching may shed light on how they contribute to cancer and how their ill effects might be overcome or entirely avoided.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 343 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Singapore 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 329 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 94 27%
Student > Master 49 14%
Researcher 48 14%
Student > Bachelor 30 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 22 6%
Other 63 18%
Unknown 37 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 124 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 90 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 45 13%
Engineering 9 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 2%
Other 26 8%
Unknown 43 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2018.
All research outputs
#3,758,761
of 12,819,002 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#568
of 1,450 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,071
of 276,408 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,819,002 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,450 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,408 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.