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High prevalence of ESBL-Producing E. coli in private and shared latrines in an informal urban settlement in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, January 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

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4 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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72 Mendeley
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Title
High prevalence of ESBL-Producing E. coli in private and shared latrines in an informal urban settlement in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13756-017-0292-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stefan Erb, Lauren D’Mello-Guyett, Hamisi M. Malebo, Robert M. Njee, Fatuma Matwewe, Jeroen Ensink, Vladimira Hinic, Andreas Widmer, Reno Frei

Abstract

Data about the burden of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing microorganisms in Africa are limited. Our study aimed to estimate the prevalence of human faecal ESBL carriage in the community of an informal urban settlement in Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, East Africa) by using environmental contamination of household latrines with ESBL as a surrogate marker. Within the context of a large survey in February 2014 assessing 636 randomly selected household latrines for faecal contamination by the detection of growth of E. coli and total faecal coliform bacteria, a randomly selected subset of the samples were screened for ESBL. Seventy latrines were screened for ESBL. An average of 11.4 persons (SD ±6.5) were sharing one latrine. Only three (4.3%) latrines had hand-washing facilities and 50 showed faeces on the floor. ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae were confirmed in 17 (24.3%) of the 70 latrine samples: 16 E. coli and 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae. Five ESBL E. coli strains were detected on door handles. The most prevalent ESBL type was CTX-M-1 group (76.5%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of a subset of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates revealed both diverse singular types and a cluster of 3 identical isolates. There was no significant difference of the latrine and household characteristics between the group with ESBL (n = 17) and the group with non-ESBL E. coli (n = 53) (p > 0.05). Almost a quarter of private and shared latrines in an informal urban settlement in Tanzania are contaminated with ESBL-producing microorganisms, suggesting a high prevalence of human ESBL faecal carriage in the community. Shared latrines may serve as a reservoir for transmission in urban community settings in Tanzania.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Researcher 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 16 22%
Unknown 21 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 10%
Environmental Science 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 7%
Other 16 22%
Unknown 23 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2018.
All research outputs
#9,245,667
of 16,697,177 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#614
of 967 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#183,351
of 411,999 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#72
of 96 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,697,177 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 967 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.8. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 411,999 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 96 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.