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Women’s social networks and use of facility delivery services for uncomplicated births in North West Ethiopia: a community-based case-control study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Women’s social networks and use of facility delivery services for uncomplicated births in North West Ethiopia: a community-based case-control study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12884-017-1626-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kerebih Asrese, Margaret E. Adamek

Abstract

High maternal mortality has remained an unmet public health challenge in the developing world. Maternal mortality in Ethiopia is among the highest in the world. Since most maternal deaths occur during labor, delivery, and the immediate postpartum period, facility delivery with skilled birth attendants is recommended to reduce maternal mortality. Nonetheless, the majority of women in Ethiopia give birth at home. Individual attributes and availability and accessibility of services deter service utilization. The role of social networks that may facilitate or constrain service use is not well studied. Community-based case-control study was conducted between February and March 2014 in Jabi Tehinan District, North West Ethiopia. Retrospective data were collected from 134 women who had uncomplicated births at health facilities and 140 women who had uncomplicated births at home within a year preceding the survey. Interviews were held with eight women who had uncomplicated births at health facilities and 11 who had uncomplicated births at home. The quantitative data were entered and analyzed using SPSS for Windows versions 16.0 and hierarchical logistic regression model was used for analysis. The qualitative data were transcribed verbatim and data were used to substantiate the quantitative data. The results indicated that social network variables were significantly associated with the use of health facilities for delivery. Taking social networks into account improved the explanation of facility use for delivery services over women's individual attributes. Women embedded within homogeneous network members (Adjusted OR 2.53; 95% CI: 1.26-5.06) and embedded within high SBA endorsement networks (Adjusted OR 7.97; 95% CI: 4.07-12.16) were more likely to deliver at health facilities than their counterparts. Women living in urban areas (Adjusted OR 3.32; 95% CI: 1.37-8.05) and had better knowledge of obstetric complications (Adjusted OR 3.01; 95% CI: 1.46-6.18) were more likely to deliver at health facilities. Social networks facilitate SBA utilization by serving as a reference for the behavior to deliver at health facilities. These findings inform health professionals and other stakeholders regarding the importance of considering women's social networks in designing intervention to increase the proportion of women who deliver at health facilities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 22%
Researcher 14 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 4%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 15 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 16%
Social Sciences 10 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Arts and Humanities 2 3%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 24 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2018.
All research outputs
#6,559,871
of 12,354,773 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,335
of 2,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,406
of 357,069 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#79
of 121 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,354,773 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,238 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 357,069 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 121 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.