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The implementation of academic detailing and its effectiveness on appropriate prescribing of pain relief medication: a real-world cluster randomized trial in Belgian general practices

Overview of attention for article published in Implementation Science, January 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
The implementation of academic detailing and its effectiveness on appropriate prescribing of pain relief medication: a real-world cluster randomized trial in Belgian general practices
Published in
Implementation Science, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13012-017-0703-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robin Bruyndonckx, Veronique Verhoeven, Sibyl Anthierens, Koen Cornelis, Katelijne Ackaert, Birgit Gielen, Samuel Coenen

Abstract

In Belgium, the debate about the effect of the national academic detailing service (ADS) on prescribing quality in general practice is ongoing. In order to evaluate both the implementation strategies of the ADS and its effectiveness on appropriate prescribing of pain relief medication, we conducted a real-world cluster randomized controlled trial (cRCT). In a pragmatic cRCT, all Belgian general practices previously visited by Farmaka were assessed for eligibility and randomized. Only practices randomized to the intervention group were invited for an academic detailing visit on appropriate prescribing of pain relief medication. GPs were unaware of the study, ensuring the production of real-world evidence but were given the option to opt out from the analysis. An objective outcome assessment was obtained using routinely collected reimbursement data. Primary outcomes were the proportion of patients reimbursed for an analgesic or NSAID, the defined daily dose of paracetamol per patient per month, the proportion of patients reimbursed for a recommended NSAID among those reimbursed for any NSAID and the proportion of patients reimbursed for both an NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor among those reimbursed for an NSAID. The impact of practice, GP and academic detailer characteristics were also assessed. Three thousand five hundred twenty-nine general practices (4530 GPs) were eligible and randomized. One thousand six hundred ninety-eight practices (2171 GPs) in the intervention group and one thousand seven hundred three (2163 GPs) in the control group were included in the analysis. The intervention had a significant impact on the proportion of patients reimbursed for a recommended NSAID among those reimbursed for any NSAID (increase in odds (95% CI): 19% (10-29%)). A clear impact on other outcomes could not be detected. Additionally, we showed that the characteristics of the academic detailers might impact the effectiveness of the visit. National implementation of academic detailing in Belgian general practices provided by Farmaka significantly improved the proportion of recommended NSAIDs prescribed by GPs, but not other outcomes related to appropriate prescribing of pain relief medication. NCT01761864 . Registered 2 January 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Master 6 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Unspecified 3 7%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 11 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 21%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Psychology 4 9%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 12 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,683,169
of 15,922,193 outputs
Outputs from Implementation Science
#686
of 1,505 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,430
of 408,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Implementation Science
#91
of 132 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,193 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,505 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 408,945 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 132 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.