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Attractive toxic sugar baits for controlling mosquitoes: a qualitative study in Bagamoyo, Tanzania

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#44 of 5,341)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
85 Mendeley
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Title
Attractive toxic sugar baits for controlling mosquitoes: a qualitative study in Bagamoyo, Tanzania
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2171-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marta Ferreira Maia, Frank Chelestino Tenywa, Hannah Nelson, Athumani Kambagha, Abigail Ashura, Ibrahim Bakari, Deogratis Mruah, Aziza Simba, Ally Bedford

Abstract

Malaria elimination is unlikely to be achieved without the implementation of new vector control interventions capable of complementing insecticide-treated nets and indoor residual spraying. Attractive-toxic sugar baits (ATSBs) are considered a new vector control paradigm. They are technologically appropriate as they are simple and affordable to produce. ATSBs kill both female and male mosquitoes attracted to sugar feed on a sugary solution containing a mosquitocidal agent and may be used indoors or outdoors. This study explored the views and perceptions on ATSBs of community members from three Coastal Tanzanian communities. Three communities were chosen to represent coastal urban, peri-urban and rural areas. Sensitization meetings were held with a total of sixty community members where ATSBs were presented and explained their mode of action. At the end of the meeting, one ATSB was given to each participant for a period of 2 weeks, after which they were invited to participate in focus group discussions (FGDs) to provide feedback on their experience. Over 50% of the participants preferred to use the bait indoors although they had been instructed to place it outdoors. Participants who used the ATSBs indoors reported fewer mosquitoes inside their homes, but were disappointed not to find the dead mosquitoes in the baits, although they had been informed that this was unlikely to happen. Most participants disliked the appearance of the bait and some thought it to be reminiscent of witchcraft. Neighbours that did not participate in the FGDs or sensitizations were sceptical of the baits. This study delivers insight on how communities in Coastal Tanzania are likely to perceive ATSBs and provides important information for future trials investigating the efficacy of ATSBs against malaria. This new vector control tool will require sensitization at community level regarding its mode of action in order to increase the acceptance and confidence in ATSBs for mosquito control given that most people are not familiar with the new paradigm. A few recommendations for product development and delivery are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 85 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 21%
Researcher 17 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 14%
Other 4 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 19 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 9%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Other 17 20%
Unknown 21 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 75. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 December 2021.
All research outputs
#432,071
of 21,385,220 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#44
of 5,341 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,435
of 442,690 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#7
of 492 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,385,220 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,341 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 442,690 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 492 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.