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In silico epitope mapping and experimental evaluation of the Merozoite Adhesive Erythrocytic Binding Protein (MAEBL) as a malaria vaccine candidate

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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45 Mendeley
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Title
In silico epitope mapping and experimental evaluation of the Merozoite Adhesive Erythrocytic Binding Protein (MAEBL) as a malaria vaccine candidate
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2144-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pedro Cravo, Renato B. Machado, Juliana A. Leite, Taizy Leda, Rossarin Suwanarusk, Najara Bittencourt, Letusa Albrecht, Carla Judice, Stefanie C. P. Lopes, Marcus V. G. Lacerda, Marcelo U. Ferreira, Irene S. Soares, Yun Shan Goh, Daniel Y. Bargieri, François Nosten, Bruce Russell, Laurent Rénia, Fabio T. M. Costa

Abstract

Technical limitations for culturing the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax have impaired the discovery of vaccine candidates, challenging the malaria eradication agenda. The immunogenicity of the M2 domain of the Merozoite Adhesive Erythrocytic Binding Protein (MAEBL) antigen cloned from the Plasmodium yoelii murine parasite, has been previously demonstrated. Detailed epitope mapping of MAEBL through immunoinformatics identified several MHCI, MHCII and B cell epitopes throughout the peptide, with several of these lying in the M2 domain and being conserved between P. vivax, P. yoelii and Plasmodium falciparum, hinting that the M2-MAEBL is pan-reactive. This hypothesis was tested through functional assays, showing that P. yoelii M2-MAEBL antisera are able to recognize and inhibit erythrocyte invasion from both P. falciparum and P. vivax parasites isolated from Thai patients, in ex vivo assays. Moreover, the sequence of the M2-MAEBL is shown to be highly conserved between P. vivax isolates from the Amazon and Thailand, indicating that the MAEBL antigen may constitute a vaccine candidate outwitting strain-specific immunity. The MAEBL antigen is promising candidate towards the development of a malaria vaccine.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 20%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Professor 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 11 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 6 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Unspecified 3 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 7%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 14 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 November 2018.
All research outputs
#7,480,445
of 13,887,828 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,378
of 3,996 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#170,398
of 397,836 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#347
of 492 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,887,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,996 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,836 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 492 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.