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Renoprotective RAAS inhibition does not affect the association between worse renal function and higher plasma aldosterone levels

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Nephrology, December 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

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1 policy source

Citations

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12 Dimensions

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45 Mendeley
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Title
Renoprotective RAAS inhibition does not affect the association between worse renal function and higher plasma aldosterone levels
Published in
BMC Nephrology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12882-017-0789-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christina M. Gant, Gozewijn D. Laverman, Liffert Vogt, Maartje C. J. Slagman, Hiddo J. L. Heerspink, Femke Waanders, Marc H. Hemmelder, Gerjan Navis

Abstract

Aldosterone is elevated in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and may be involved in hypertension. Surprisingly, the determinants of the plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) and its role in hypertension are not well studied in CKD. Therefore, we studied the determinants of aldosterone and its association with blood pressure in CKD patients. We also studied this during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition (RAASi) to establish clinical relevance, as RAASi is the treatment of choice in CKD with albuminuria. We performed a post-hoc analysis on data from a randomized controlled double blind cross-over trial in non-diabetic CKD patients (n = 33, creatinine clearance (CrCl) 85 (75-95) ml/min, proteinuria 3.2 (2.5-4.0) g/day). Patients were treated with losartan 100 mg (ARB), and ARB + hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg (HCT), during both a regular (200 ± 10 mmol Na+/day) and low (89 ± 8 mmol Na+/day) dietary sodium intake, in 6-week study periods. PAC data at the end of each study period were analyzed. The association between PAC and blood pressure was analyzed continuously, and according to PAC above or below the median. Lower CrCl was correlated with higher PAC during placebo as well as during ARB (β = -1.213, P = 0.008 and β = -1.090, P = 0.010). Higher PAC was not explained by high renin, illustrated by a comparable association between CrCl and the aldosterone-to-renin ratio. The association between lower CrCl and higher PAC was also found in a second study with single RAASi with ACE inhibition (ACEi; lisinopril 40 mg/day), and dual RAASi (lisinopril 40 mg/day + valsartan 320 mg/day). Higher PAC was associated with a higher systolic blood pressure (P = 0.010) during different study periods. Only during maximal treatment with ARB + HCT + dietary sodium restriction, blood pressure was no longer different in subjects with a PAC above and below the median. In CKD patients with a standardized regular sodium intake, worse renal function is associated with a higher aldosterone, untreated and during RAASi with either ARB, ACEi, or both. Furthermore, higher aldosterone is associated with higher blood pressure, which can be treated with the combination of RAASi, HCT and dietary sodium restriction. The first study was performed before it was standard to register trials and the study was not retrospectively registered. The second study was registered in the Netherlands Trial Register on the 5th of May 2006 (NTR675).

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 18%
Student > Master 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Lecturer 2 4%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 15 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Unspecified 2 4%
Psychology 2 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 15 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2021.
All research outputs
#7,543,662
of 23,015,156 outputs
Outputs from BMC Nephrology
#854
of 2,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,759
of 440,645 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Nephrology
#18
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,015,156 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,497 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 440,645 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.