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Forecasting imbalances in the global health labor market and devising policy responses

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#37 of 943)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
107 Mendeley
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Title
Forecasting imbalances in the global health labor market and devising policy responses
Published in
Human Resources for Health, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12960-017-0264-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard M. Scheffler, James Campbell, Giorgio Cometto, Akiko Maeda, Jenny Liu, Tim A. Bruckner, Daniel R. Arnold, Tim Evans

Abstract

The High-Level Commission on Health Employment and Economic Growth released its report to the United Nations Secretary-General in September 2016. It makes important recommendations that are based on estimates of over 40 million new health sector jobs by 2030 in mostly high- and middle-income countries and a needs-based shortage of 18 million, mostly in low- and middle-income countries. This paper shows how these key findings were developed, the global policy dilemmas they raise, and relevant policy solutions. Regression analysis is used to produce estimates of health worker need, demand, and supply. Projections of health worker need, demand, and supply in 2030 are made under the assumption that historical trends continue into the future. To deliver essential health services required for the universal health coverage target of the Sustainable Development Goal 3, there will be a need for almost 45 million health workers in 2013 which is projected to reach almost 53 million in 2030 (across 165 countries). This results in a needs-based shortage of almost 17 million in 2013. The demand-based results suggest a projected demand of 80 million health workers by 2030. Demand-based analysis shows that high- and middle-income countries will have the economic capacity to employ tens of millions additional health workers, but they could face shortages due to supply not keeping up with demand. By contrast, low-income countries will face both low demand for and supply of health workers. This means that even if countries are able to produce additional workers to meet the need threshold, they may not be able to employ and retain these workers without considerably higher economic growth, especially in the health sector.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 107 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Researcher 11 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 9%
Other 24 22%
Unknown 13 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 16%
Social Sciences 8 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 6 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 6 6%
Other 14 13%
Unknown 20 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 39. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2021.
All research outputs
#640,822
of 17,342,898 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#37
of 943 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,326
of 415,533 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#9
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,342,898 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 943 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 415,533 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.