↓ Skip to main content

Understanding the factors that effect maximal fat oxidation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2022
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
17 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
121 tweeters
facebook
14 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
113 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
742 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Understanding the factors that effect maximal fat oxidation
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2022
DOI 10.1186/s12970-018-0207-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Troy Purdom, Len Kravitz, Karol Dokladny, Christine Mermier

Abstract

Lipids as a fuel source for energy supply during submaximal exercise originate from subcutaneous adipose tissue derived fatty acids (FA), intramuscular triacylglycerides (IMTG), cholesterol and dietary fat. These sources of fat contribute to fatty acid oxidation (FAox) in various ways. The regulation and utilization of FAs in a maximal capacity occur primarily at exercise intensities between 45 and 65% VO2max, is known as maximal fat oxidation (MFO), and is measured in g/min. Fatty acid oxidation occurs during submaximal exercise intensities, but is also complimentary to carbohydrate oxidation (CHOox). Due to limitations within FA transport across the cell and mitochondrial membranes, FAox is limited at higher exercise intensities. The point at which FAox reaches maximum and begins to decline is referred to as the crossover point. Exercise intensities that exceed the crossover point (~65% VO2max) utilize CHO as the predominant fuel source for energy supply. Training status, exercise intensity, exercise duration, sex differences, and nutrition have all been shown to affect cellular expression responsible for FAox rate. Each stimulus affects the process of FAox differently, resulting in specific adaptions that influence endurance exercise performance. Endurance training, specifically long duration (>2 h) facilitate adaptations that alter both the origin of FAs and FAox rate. Additionally, the influence of sex and nutrition on FAox are discussed. Finally, the role of FAox in the improvement of performance during endurance training is discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 121 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 742 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 742 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 154 21%
Student > Master 112 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 54 7%
Researcher 44 6%
Other 35 5%
Other 133 18%
Unknown 210 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 185 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 80 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 72 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 52 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 4%
Other 88 12%
Unknown 234 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 219. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2022.
All research outputs
#147,225
of 23,011,300 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#61
of 887 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,892
of 440,243 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#60
of 851 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,011,300 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 887 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 58.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 440,243 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 851 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.