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Mental health service utilization is associated with retention in care among persons living with HIV at a university-affiliated HIV clinic

Overview of attention for article published in AIDS Research and Therapy, January 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

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61 Mendeley
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Title
Mental health service utilization is associated with retention in care among persons living with HIV at a university-affiliated HIV clinic
Published in
AIDS Research and Therapy, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12981-018-0188-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lauren A. Saag, Ashutosh R. Tamhane, D. Scott Batey, Michael J. Mugavero, Ellen F. Eaton

Abstract

Mental health (MH) comorbidities reduce retention in care for persons living with HIV (PLWH) and are associated with poor health outcomes. Optimizing retention in primary care is vital, as poor retention is associated with delayed receipt of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, ARV non-adherence, and poor health outcomes, including failure to suppress viral load, decreased CD4 counts, and clinically significant ARV drug resistance. We hypothesized that MH service utilization would be associated with improved retention in care for patients with HIV and MH comorbidities. This is a retrospective analysis of PLWH initiating outpatient HIV health care at a university-affiliated HIV clinic between January 2007 and December 2013. We examined the association between MH service utilization and retention in care, the outcome of interest, using univariate and multivariable logistic regression. Overall, 627 (84.4%) out of 743 patients were retained in care using the Health Resources & Services Administration HIV/AIDS Bureau (HRSA/HAB) metric. A multivariable model adjusted for several sociodemographic factors, MH comorbidities, and MH service utilization. The results suggest that lack of health insurance (public ORadj = 0.3, p < 0.01; no insurance ORadj = 0.4, p < 0.01) and ≥ 3 MH comorbidities (ORadj = 0.3, P = 0.01) were associated with decreased retention in care. Conversely, older age (> 45 years, ORadj. = 1.6, p = 0.14) and ≥ 3 MH service utilization visits (ORadj. = 6.8, p < 0.01) were associated with increased retention in care. Even in the absence of documented MH comorbidities, improved retention in care was observed with increasing MH service utilization. In order to achieve the US-based National HIV/AIDS Strategy goal of 90% retention in care for PLWH, MH service utilization should be considered along with other evidence-based interventions to improve retention for PLWH newly engaged in care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 15%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Other 13 21%
Unknown 13 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 11%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Psychology 4 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 19 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2020.
All research outputs
#2,431,012
of 18,663,462 outputs
Outputs from AIDS Research and Therapy
#59
of 460 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,215
of 379,672 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AIDS Research and Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,663,462 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 460 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 379,672 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them