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Expansion of cytochrome P450 and cathepsin genes in the generalist herbivore brown marmorated stink bug

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, January 2018
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Title
Expansion of cytochrome P450 and cathepsin genes in the generalist herbivore brown marmorated stink bug
Published in
BMC Genomics, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-017-4281-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raman Bansal, Andy Michel

Abstract

The brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) is an invasive pest in North America which causes severe economic losses on tree fruits, ornamentals, vegetables, and field crops. The H. halys is an extreme generalist and this feeding behaviour may have been a major contributor behind its establishment and successful adaptation in invasive habitats of North America. To develop an understanding into the mechanism of H. halys' generalist herbivory, here we specifically focused on genes putatively facilitating its adaptation on diverse host plants. We generated over 142 million reads via sequencing eight RNA-Seq libraries, each representing an individual H. halys adult. The de novo assembly contained 79,855 high quality transcripts, totalling 39,600,178 bases. Following a comprehensive transcriptome analysis, H. halys had an expanded suite of cytochrome P450 and cathepsin-L genes compared to other insects. Detailed characterization of P450 genes from the CYP6 family, known for herbivore adaptation on host plants, strongly hinted towards H. halys-specific expansions involving gene duplications. In subsequent RT-PCR experiments, both P450 and cathepsin genes exhibited tissue-specific or distinct expression patterns which supported their principal roles of detoxification and/or digestion in a particular tissue. Our analysis into P450 and cathepsin genes in H. halys offers new insights into potential mechanisms for understanding generalist herbivory and adaptation success in invasive habitats. Additionally, the large-scale transcriptomic resource developed here provides highly useful data for gene discovery; functional, population and comparative genomics as well as efforts to assemble and annotate the H. halys genome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 25%
Student > Master 6 19%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 16%
Materials Science 1 3%
Unknown 10 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2018.
All research outputs
#13,222,146
of 16,638,522 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#6,935
of 9,107 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#269,366
of 372,475 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#20
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,638,522 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,107 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.