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Oscillometric blood pressure by age and height for non overweight children and adolescents in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, January 2018
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Title
Oscillometric blood pressure by age and height for non overweight children and adolescents in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo
Published in
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12872-018-0741-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emmanuel Kiyana Muyumba, Dophra Ngoy Nkulu, Clarence Kaut Mukeng, Jacques Mbaz Musung, Placide Kambola Kakoma, Christian Ngama Kakisingi, Oscar Numbi Luboya, Françoise Kaj Malonga, Justin Kalungwe Kizonde, Olivier Mukuku, Weili Yan

Abstract

The diagnosis of hypertension in children is complex because based on normative values by sex, age and height, and these values vary depending on the environment. Available BP references used, because of the absence of local data, do not correspond to our pediatric population. Accordingly, our study aimed to provide the BP threshold for children and adolescents in Lubumbashi (DRC) and to compare them with German (KIGGS study), Polish (OLAF study) and Chinese (CHNS study) references. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 7523 school-children aged 3 to 17 years. The standardized BP measurements were obtained using a validated oscillometric device (Datascope Accutor Plus). After excluding overweight and obese subjects according to the IOTF definition (n = 640), gender-specific SBP and DBP percentiles, which simultaneously accounted for age and height by using an extension of the LMS method, namely GAMLSS, were tabulated. The 50th, 90th and 95th percentiles of SBP and DBP for 3373 boys and 3510 girls were tabulated simultaneously by age and height (5th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 95th height percentile). Before 13 years the 50th and 90th percentiles of SBP for boys were higher compared with those of KIGGS and OLAF, and after they became lower: the difference for adolescents aged 17 years was respectively 8 mmHg (KIGGS) and 4 mmHg (OLAF). Concerning girls, the SBP 50th percentile was close to that of OLAF and KIGGS studies with differences that did not exceed 3 mmHg; whereas the 90th percentile of girls at different ages was high. Our oscillometric 50th and 90th percentiles of SBP and DBP were very high compared to referential ausculatory percentiles of the CHNS study respectively for boys from 8 to 14 mmHg and 7 to 13 mmHg; and for girls from 10 to 16 mmHg and 11 to 16 mmHg. The proposed BP thresholds percentiles enable early detection and treatment of children and adolescents with high BP and develop a local program of health promotion in schools and family.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Postgraduate 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 20 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 18%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Psychology 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 24 48%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2018.
All research outputs
#15,489,831
of 23,018,998 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
#849
of 1,637 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#270,171
of 441,339 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
#17
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,018,998 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,637 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 441,339 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.