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Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
186 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
133 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
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Title
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2003
DOI 10.1186/1477-7827-1-73
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shuk-Mei Ho

Abstract

Ovarian carcinoma (OCa) continues to be the leading cause of death due to gynecologic malignancies and the vast majority of OCa is derived from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) and its cystic derivatives. Epidemiological evidence strongly suggests that steroid hormones, primarily estrogens and progesterone, are implicated in ovarian carcinogenesis. However, it has proved difficult to fully understand their mechanisms of action on the tumorigenic process. New convincing data have indicated that estrogens favor neoplastic transformation of the OSE while progesterone offers protection against OCa development. Specifically, estrogens, particularly those present in ovulatory follicles, are both genotoxic and mitogenic to OSE cells. In contrast, pregnancy-equivalent levels progesterone are highly effective as apoptosis inducers for OSE and OCa cells. In this regard, high-dose progestin may exert an exfoliation effect and rid an aged OSE of pre-malignant cells. A limited number of clinical studies has demonstrated efficacies of antiestrogens, aromatase inhibitors, and progestins alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of OCa. As a result of increased life expectancy in most countries, the number of women taking hormone replacement therapies (HRT) continues to grow. Thus, knowledge of the mechanism of action of steroid hormones on the OSE and OCa is of paramount significance to HRT risk assessment and to the development of novel therapies for the prevention and treatment of OCa.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 133 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
India 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Unknown 127 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 22%
Student > Master 22 17%
Student > Bachelor 19 14%
Researcher 15 11%
Student > Postgraduate 8 6%
Other 20 15%
Unknown 20 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 4%
Other 13 10%
Unknown 24 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2018.
All research outputs
#3,567,913
of 22,487,039 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#147
of 959 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,659
of 129,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#9
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,487,039 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 959 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 129,079 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.