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Individual and household attributes influence the dynamics of the personal skin microbiota and its association network

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
15 tweeters
patent
1 patent

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
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Title
Individual and household attributes influence the dynamics of the personal skin microbiota and its association network
Published in
Microbiome, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40168-018-0412-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcus H. Y. Leung, Xinzhao Tong, David Wilkins, Hedwig H. L. Cheung, Patrick K. H. Lee

Abstract

Numerous studies have thus far characterized the temporal dynamics of the skin microbiota of healthy individuals. However, there is no information regarding the dynamics of different microbial association network properties. Also, there is little understanding of how living conditions, specifically cohabitation and household occupancy, may be associated with the nature and extent (or degree) of cutaneous microbiota change within individuals over time. In this study, the dynamics of the skin microbiota, and its association networks, on the skin of urban residents over four seasons were characterized. Similar to western cohorts, the individuals of this cohort show different extents of variations in relative abundance of common skin colonizers, concomitant with individual- and household-associated changes in differential abundances of bacterial taxa. Interestingly, the individualized nature of the skin microbiota extends to various aspects of microbial association networks, including co-occurring and excluding taxa, as well as overall network structural properties. Household occupancy is correlated with the extent of variations in relative abundance of Propionibacterium, Acinetobacter, and Bacillus over multiple skin sites. In addition, household occupancy is also associated with the extent of temporal changes in microbial diversity and composition within a resident's skin. This is the first study investigating the potential roles household occupancy has on the extent of change in one's cutaneous microbiota and its association network structures. In particular, we show that relationships between the skin microbiota of a resident, his/her cohabitants, and those of non-cohabitants over time are highly personal and are possibly governed by living conditions and nature of interactions between cohabitants within households over 1 year. This study calls for increased awareness to personal and lifestyle factors that may govern relationships between the skin microbiota of one individual and those of cohabitants, and changes in the microbial association network structures within a person over time. The current study will act as a baseline for future assessments in comparing against temporal dynamics of microbiota from individuals with different skin conditions and for identifying residential factors that are beneficial in promoting the dynamics of the skin microbiota associated with health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 25%
Researcher 13 23%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Master 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 12 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 10 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 9%
Environmental Science 4 7%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 16 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2021.
All research outputs
#1,341,697
of 18,823,067 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#513
of 1,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,221
of 383,069 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,823,067 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,132 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 383,069 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them