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RETRACTED ARTICLE: Al Kharj diabetic patients’ perception about diabetes mellitus using revised-illness perception questionnaire (IPQ-R)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, February 2018
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1 tweeter

Citations

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43 Mendeley
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Title
RETRACTED ARTICLE: Al Kharj diabetic patients’ perception about diabetes mellitus using revised-illness perception questionnaire (IPQ-R)
Published in
BMC Family Practice, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12875-018-0713-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sameer Al-Ghamdi, Gulfam Ahmad, Ali Hassan Ali, Nasraddin Bahakim, Salman Alomran, Waleed Alhowikan, Salman Almutairi, Tariq Basalem, Faisal Aljuaid

Abstract

Illness perception questionnaires for various medical conditions have become more useful in recent years. However, very few have addressed this issue for Type 2 diabetes in Saudi Arabia. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to Type 2 diabetic patients attendees of primary health care centers and Al Kharj Military Industries Corporation Hospital in Al Kharj, Saudi Arabia, from November 24th 2016 to April 24th, 2017. Overall, 383 of the 500 distributed questionnaires were returned, and 187 were males (48.8). Most participants understood that what led to diabetes was hereditary, including diet or eating habits. The Cronbach's alpha value for identity, timeline (cyclical), and emotional factors were relatively high, showing that these scales had a strong level of internal consistency; it also showed that the timeline (acute/chronic) and treatment control scales were low, thus showing internal consistency of these scales. Cronbach's value of coherence and consequences scales were low. Saudis with type 2 diabetes mellitus had appropriate knowledge of their disease. They agreed that diabetes was likely to be permanent and would have major consequences on their lives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Researcher 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 12 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 26%
Psychology 8 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 16%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 13 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2018.
All research outputs
#16,098,168
of 20,028,080 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#1,522
of 1,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#290,346
of 391,297 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,028,080 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,844 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 391,297 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them