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Rapid increase of overweight and obesity among primary school-aged children in the Caribbean; high initial BMI is the most significant predictor

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Rapid increase of overweight and obesity among primary school-aged children in the Caribbean; high initial BMI is the most significant predictor
Published in
BMC Obesity, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40608-018-0182-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Walaa A. Mumena, Isabella Francis-Granderson, Leroy E. Phillip, Katherine Gray-Donald

Abstract

To examine predictors of increasing overweight among children in two developing countries. Primary school children (6-10 y at baseline, n = 336) and their caregivers.Longitudinal data were collected in 2012, with follow-up 18 months later. Data on children's height, weight and dietary intake were collected within 8 primary public schools in Trinidad and 7 schools in St. Kitts. Caregivers' demographic and anthropometric data were also collected. At baseline, children's age and sex and caregivers' BMI, age, and marital status and reported dietary intake were similar across all weight groups. The incidence of overweight and obesity among children was 8.8% and 8.1%, respectively. Dietary intake at baseline was not related to becoming overweight or obese. Similarly there were no differences in reported intake among children who became overweight or obese except that they consumed fewer fruits (0.54±0.92 vs. 0.98±1.66, p = 0.017). Misreporting of energy intake was higher among overweight/obese children as compared to those who were not overweight/obese (27% vs. 17%, p = 0.047). The baseline predictors of increasing BMI (adjusted) of the children were older age, higher baseline BMI z-score and higher height-for-age (HFA) z-score; caregiver BMI, children's energy intake (with adjustment for misreporting) did not predict changes in children's BMI. The increasing prevalence of overweight/obesity among children is a serious problem in the Caribbean. Heavier children are at elevated risk of continued rapid increase in their weight status, pointing to the need for early intervention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 23%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Researcher 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 10 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 5 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Other 7 23%
Unknown 10 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2018.
All research outputs
#3,659,294
of 13,528,042 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#69
of 182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,338
of 348,471 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,528,042 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 182 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 348,471 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them