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Disparities in severe shigellosis among adults — Foodborne diseases active surveillance network, 2002–2014

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
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Title
Disparities in severe shigellosis among adults — Foodborne diseases active surveillance network, 2002–2014
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5115-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lindsey S. McCrickard, Stacy M. Crim, Sunkyung Kim, Anna Bowen

Abstract

Shigella causes approximately 500,000 illnesses, 6000 hospitalizations, and 40 deaths in the United States annually, but incidence and populations at risk for severe shigellosis among adults are unclear. This study describes severe shigellosis among US adults. We analyzed Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network data for infections caused by Shigella among adults ≥18 years old during 2002-2014. Criteria to define severe shigellosis included hospitalization, bacteremia, or death. We estimated annual incidence of shigellosis per 100,000 among adult populations, and conducted multivariable mixed-effects logistic regression to assess associations between severe shigellosis, demographic factors and Shigella species among adults with shigellosis. Among 9968 shigellosis cases, 2764 (28%) were severe. Restricting to cases due to S. sonnei and S. flexneri, median annual incidence of severe shigellosis among adults was 0.56 and highest overall incidence was among black males 18-49 years old (1.58). Among adults with shigellosis, odds of severe disease were higher among males than females aged 18-49 years old (OR [95% CI] = 1.32 [1.15-1.52], p < 0.001) and among males than females with S. flexneri infections (OR [95% CI] =1.39 [1.10-1.75], p = 0.005). The odds of severe shigellosis were higher among blacks than whites (OR [95% CI] = 1.36 [1.22-1.52], p < 0.001). Among adults, men 18-49 years old, particularly blacks, have the highest incidence of severe shigellosis. Among adults with shigellosis, severe shigellosis was associated with being male in age group 18-49 years, with infections caused by S. flexneri, and with black race. Future research should assess associations between severe shigellosis and sexual practices, antimicrobial resistance, comorbidities, and access to care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 21%
Researcher 5 8%
Other 2 3%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 3%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 17 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Unspecified 3 5%
Other 12 20%
Unknown 21 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2018.
All research outputs
#955,123
of 13,157,264 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,067
of 9,040 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,988
of 346,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,157,264 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,040 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,218 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them