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Bariatric surgery emphasizes biological sex differences in rodent hepatic lipid handling

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, January 2017
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Title
Bariatric surgery emphasizes biological sex differences in rodent hepatic lipid handling
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13293-017-0126-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bernadette E. Grayson, Ruth Gutierrez-Aguilar, Joyce E. Sorrell, Emily K. Matter, Michelle R. Adams, Philip Howles, Rebekah Karns, Randy J. Seeley, Darleen A. Sandoval

Abstract

Eighty percent of patients who receive bariatric surgery are women, yet the majority of preclinical studies are in male rodents. Because sex differences drive hepatic gene expression and overall lipid metabolism, we sought to determine whether sex differences were also apparent in these endpoints in response to bariatric surgery. Two cohorts of age-matched virgin male and female Long-Evans rats were placed on a high fat diet for 3 weeks and then received either Sham or vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), a surgery which resects 80% of the stomach with no intestinal rearrangement. Each sex exhibited significantly decreased body weight due to a reduction in fat mass relative to Sham controls (p < 0.05). Microarray and follow-up qPCR on liver revealed striking sex differences in gene expression after VSG that reflected a down-regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism and an up-regulation of hepatic inflammatory pathways in females vs. males after VSG. While the males had a significant reduction in hepatic lipids after VSG, there was no reduction in females. Ad lib-fed and fasting circulating triglycerides, and postprandial chylomicron production were significantly lower in VSG relative to Sham animals of both sexes (p < 0.01). However, hepatic VLDL production, highest in sham-operated females, was significantly reduced by VSG in females but not males. Taken together, although both males and females lose weight and improve plasma lipids, there are large-scale sex differences in hepatic gene expression and consequently hepatic lipid metabolism after VSG.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 16%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Student > Master 3 8%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 11 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Computer Science 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 12 32%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 April 2020.
All research outputs
#20,247,296
of 24,896,578 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#505
of 559 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#323,283
of 430,133 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,896,578 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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