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Disease-related determinants are associated with mortality in dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, February 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

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1 blog
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14 X users

Citations

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Title
Disease-related determinants are associated with mortality in dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13195-018-0348-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hanneke F. M. Rhodius-Meester, Hilkka Liedes, Ted Koene, Afina W. Lemstra, Charlotte E. Teunissen, Frederik Barkhof, Philip Scheltens, Mark van Gils, Jyrki Lötjönen, Wiesje M. van der Flier

Abstract

Survival after dementia diagnosis varies considerably. Previous studies were focused mainly on factors related to demographics and comorbidity rather than on Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related determinants. We set out to answer the question whether markers with proven diagnostic value also have prognostic value. We aimed to identify disease-related determinants associated with mortality in patients with AD. We included 616 patients (50% female; age 67 ± 8 years; mean Mini Mental State Examination score 22 ± 3) with dementia due to AD from the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort. Information on mortality was obtained from the Dutch Municipal Register. We used age- and sex-adjusted Cox proportional hazards analysis to study associations of baseline demographics, comorbidity, neuropsychology, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (medial temporal lobe, global cortical and parietal atrophy, and measures of small vessel disease), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (β-amyloid 1-42, total tau, and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 [p-tau]) with mortality (outcome). In addition, we built a multivariate model using forward selection. After an average of 4.9 ± 2.0 years, 213 (35%) patients had died. Age- and sex-adjusted Cox models showed that older age (HR 1.29 [95% CI 1.12-1.48]), male sex (HR 1.60 [95% CI 1.22-2.11]), worse scores on cognitive functioning (HR 1.14 [95% CI 1.01-1.30] to 1.31 [95% CI 1.13-1.52]), and more global and hippocampal atrophy on MRI (HR 1.18 [95% CI 1.01-1.37] and HR 1.18 [95% CI 1.02-1.37]) were associated with increased risk of mortality. There were no associations with comorbidity, level of activities of daily living, apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 status, or duration of disease. Using forward selection, the multivariate model included a panel of age, sex, cognitive tests, atrophy of the medial temporal lobe, and CSF p-tau. In this relatively young sample of patients with AD, disease-related determinants were associated with an increased risk of mortality, whereas neither comorbidity nor APOE genotype had any prognostic value.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 15%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 4 6%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 22 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 17%
Neuroscience 7 11%
Psychology 5 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Computer Science 3 5%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 27 41%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,760,791
of 23,023,224 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#320
of 1,244 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,959
of 331,055 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#6
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,023,224 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,244 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,055 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.