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High experienced continuity in breast cancer care is associated with high health related quality of life

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, February 2018
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2 tweeters

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67 Mendeley
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Title
High experienced continuity in breast cancer care is associated with high health related quality of life
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-2925-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susann Plate, Louise Emilsson, Martin Söderberg, Yvonne Brandberg, Fredrik Wärnberg

Abstract

High experienced continuity is known to be associated with lower needs for supportive care and most likely higher quality of life. On this background, the aim of this study was to investigate if patient-experienced continuity of care was associated with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in breast cancer patients treated at two different-sized breast cancer units. In 2016, two questionnaires, "Statements on experienced continuity of care" and "The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30)", were sent out to patients diagnosed between 2011 and 2014 at two different-sized breast cancer units in Sweden. Lead times and other data reflecting medical quality were collected from the patients' medical records and from the National Swedish Breast Cancer Quality Register. Of 356 eligible patients, 231 (65%) answered the questionnaires, of whom 218 patients were included in the analyses. A statistically significant association was found between high experienced continuity and high global HRQoL (p = 0.03). Continuity was higher at the smaller unit, while no major differences between the units were found regarding medical quality or lead times. The study found that high experienced continuity and HRQoL was strongly associated. A statistically significant higher continuity of care was found at the smaller unit, in line with what was expected. The absence of clinically relevant differences in lead times and medical quality may indicate that continuity could be achieved without loss of quality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Student > Master 7 10%
Researcher 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 4%
Lecturer 3 4%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 33 49%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 13%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Mathematics 1 1%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 36 54%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2018.
All research outputs
#9,635,108
of 12,550,112 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#3,365
of 4,161 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,931
of 271,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,550,112 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,161 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,293 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them