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Factors affecting first month adherence due to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive adults at Felege Hiwot Teaching and Specialized Hospital, north-western Ethiopia; a prospective study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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112 Mendeley
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Title
Factors affecting first month adherence due to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive adults at Felege Hiwot Teaching and Specialized Hospital, north-western Ethiopia; a prospective study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-018-2977-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Awoke Seyoum Tegegne, Principal Ndlovu, Temesgen Zewotir

Abstract

Non-adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is one of the factors for treatment failure in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients in developing countries. The main objective of this study was to identify factors for treatment failure among adult HIV patients based on the assessment of first month adherence in the study area. The study was conducted using secondary data from antiretroviral unit at Felege Hiwot Teaching and Specialized Hospital. A prospective study was undertaken on 792 randomly selected adult HIV positive patients who have started HAART. The variable of interest, adherence to HAART was categorized as non-adherence if a patient had taken less than 95% of the prescribed medication and this was measured using pill counts. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square tests of association, independent samples t-test and binary logistic regression were used for data analysis. In first month therapy, 68.2% of the patients belong to adherence group to HAART. As age increases, a patient without cell phone was less likely to be adherent to HAART as compared to patients with cell phone (AOR = 0.661, 95% CI: (0.243, 0.964)). Compared to urban patients, rural patients were less likely to adhere to HAART (AOR = 0.995, 95% CI: (0.403, 0.999)). A patient who did not disclose his/her disease to families or communities had less probability to be adherent to HAART (AOR = 0.325, 95% CI: (0.01, 0.64)). Similarly, a patient who did not get social support (AOR = 0.42, 95% CI: (0,021, 0.473)) had less probability of adherence to HAART. The main reasons for patients to be non-adherent were forgetfulness, side effects, feeling sick and running out of medication. This study indentified certain groups of patients who are at higher risk and who need counseling. Such groups should be targeted and tailored for improvement of adherence to HAART among HIV positive adults. The health care providers should advise the community to provide social support to HIV positive patients whenever their disease is disclosed. On the other hand, patients should disclose their disease to community to get integrated supports. HIV infected patients who are directed to start HAART should adhere the prescribed medication. For the adherence to be effective, patients who have cell phone should use them as reminder to take pills on time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 112 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 22%
Researcher 11 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 8%
Student > Bachelor 9 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 5%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 37 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 16%
Psychology 9 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 3%
Other 13 12%
Unknown 43 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2018.
All research outputs
#10,044,254
of 17,895,029 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,521
of 6,311 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,248
of 285,358 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,895,029 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,311 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,358 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them