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The impact of age differences in couples on depressive symptoms: evidence from the Korean longitudinal study of aging (2006–2012)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, February 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

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1 news outlet
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1 blog
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1 Facebook page

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14 Dimensions

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37 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of age differences in couples on depressive symptoms: evidence from the Korean longitudinal study of aging (2006–2012)
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12888-015-0388-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jae-Hyun Kim, Eun-Cheol Park, Sang Gyu Lee

Abstract

BackgroundDepression represents one of the most common psychiatric disorders among older adults. Married couples are affected frequently, and psychiatric problems usually affect marital satisfaction. Despite the frequency of such relationships, it appears that very few studies have examined the issues that arise in couples of this type of marriage. Therefore, we investigate whether age differences between couples affect extent of depressive symptoms among older adults.MethodsOur analysis included 2,881 couples (i.e., 2,881 households) at least 45 years of age at baseline (2006), in addition to 3,033 couples in 2008, 2,772 couples in 2010, and 2,711 couples in 2012. A generalized linear mixed model was used for the data analysis.ResultsWhen the age difference between husbands and wives was 3 years or less, the estimated severity of depressive symptoms was 0.309 higher (SE¿=¿0.084, p¿=¿0.000) than that of same-aged couples. When the age gap was 3 years or more, the estimated severity of depressive symptoms was 0.645 higher (SE¿=¿0.109, p¿<¿.0001) than that of same-aged couples. For every 1¿2 years extra in age difference between wives and husbands, the estimated severity of depressive symptoms increased by 0.194 (SE¿=¿0.082, p¿=¿0.018), compared with same-aged couples.ConclusionsAge differences between husbands and wives impact their relationship, including any particular marital issues encountered.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Master 3 8%
Professor 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 8 22%
Unknown 12 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 30%
Psychology 4 11%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 16 43%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 December 2023.
All research outputs
#1,546,663
of 25,081,285 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#504
of 5,344 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,556
of 363,912 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#12
of 74 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,081,285 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,344 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 363,912 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 74 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.