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The effect of excess weight on circulating inflammatory cytokines in drug-naïve first-episode psychosis individuals

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
The effect of excess weight on circulating inflammatory cytokines in drug-naïve first-episode psychosis individuals
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12974-018-1096-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

María Juncal-Ruiz, Laura Riesco-Dávila, Víctor Ortiz-García de la Foz, Mariluz Ramírez-Bonilla, Obdulia Martínez-García, Juan Irure-Ventura, Juan Carlos Leza, Marcos López-Hoyos, Benedicto Crespo-Facorro

Abstract

Low-grade inflammation has been repeatedly associated with both excess weight and psychosis. However, no previous studies have addressed the direct effect of body mass index (BMI) on basal serum cytokines in individuals with first-episode psychosis (FEP). The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of BMI on basal serum cytokine levels in FEP patients and control subjects, separating the total sample into two groups: normal-weight and overweight individuals. This is a prospective and open-label study. We selected 75 FEP patients and 75 healthy controls with similar characteristics to patients according to the following variables: sex, age, and cannabis and tobacco consumption. Both controls and patients were separated into two groups according to their BMI: subjects with a BMI under 25 were considered as normal weight and those with a BMI equal to or more than 25 were considered as overweight. Serum levels of 21 cytokines/chemokines were measured at baseline using the Human High Sensitivity T Cell Magnetic Bead Panel protocol from the Milliplex® Map Kit. We compared the basal serum levels of the 21 cytokines between control and patient groups according to their BMI. In the normal-weight group, IL-8 was the only cytokine that was higher in patients than in the control group (p = 0.001), whereas in the overweight group, serum levels of two pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, p = 0.000; IL-1β, p = 0.003), two chemokines (IL-8, p = 0.001; MIP-1β, p = 0.001), four Th-1 and Th-2 cytokines (IL-13, p = 0.009; IL-2, p = 0.001; IL-7, p = 0.001; IL-12p70, p = 0.010), and one Type-3 cytokine (IL-23, p = 0.010) were higher in patients than in controls. Most differences in the basal serum cytokine levels between patients and healthy volunteers were found in the overweight group. These findings suggest that excess weight can alter the homeostasis of the immune system and therefore may have an additive pro-inflammatory effect on the one produced by psychosis in the central nervous system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Professor 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 12 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 18 49%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2018.
All research outputs
#9,521,331
of 18,051,940 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#1,070
of 2,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,738
of 286,025 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,051,940 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,189 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,025 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them