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Anti-human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a antibodies may affect trophoblast functions crucial for placental development: a laboratory study using an in vitro model

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, April 2017
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Title
Anti-human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a antibodies may affect trophoblast functions crucial for placental development: a laboratory study using an in vitro model
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12958-017-0245-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mariana Eksteen, Gøril Heide, Heidi Tiller, Yan Zhou, Nora Hersoug Nedberg, Inigo Martinez-Zubiaurre, Anne Husebekk, Bjørn R. Skogen, Tor B. Stuge, Mette Kjær

Abstract

Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a bleeding disorder caused by maternal antibodies against paternal human platelet antigens (HPAs) on fetal platelets. Antibodies against HPA-1a are accountable for the majority of FNAIT cases. We have previously shown that high levels of maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies are associated with clinically significant reduced birth weight in newborn boys. Chronic inflammatory placental lesions are associated with increased risk of reduced birth weight and have previously been reported in connection with FNAIT pregnancies. The HPA-1a epitope is located on integrin β3 that is associated with integrin αIIb (the fibrinogen receptor) on platelets and megakaryocytes. Integrin β3 is also associated with integrin αV forming the αVβ3 integrin heterodimer, the vitronectin receptor, which is expressed on various cell types, including trophoblast cells. It is therefore thinkable that maternal anti-HPA-1a antibodies present during early pregnancy may affect placenta function through binding to the HPA-1a antigen epitope on invasive throphoblasts. The aim of the study was to examine whether interaction of a human anti-HPA-1a monoclonal antibody (mAb) with HPA-1a on trophoblast cells affect adhesion, migration and invasion of extravillous trophoblast cells. An in vitro model with human anti-HPA-1a mAb, clone 26.4, and the first trimester extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR8/SVneo was employed. The xCELLigence system was utilized to assess the possible effect of anti-HPA-1a mAb on adhesion and migration of HTR8/SVneo cells. Specially designed chambers precoated with Matrigel were used to assess the effect on the invasive capacity of cells. We found that human anti-HPA-1a mAb 26.4 partially inhibits adhesion and migratory capacity of HTR8/SVneo cells. Our findings suggest that anti-HPA-1a antibodies may affect trophoblast functions crucial for normal placental development. Future studies including primary throphoblast cells and polyclonal anti-HPA-1a antibodies are needed to confirm these results.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Student > Master 4 13%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 11 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 19%
Psychology 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 11 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 March 2018.
All research outputs
#13,159,862
of 21,830,709 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#411
of 922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#155,228
of 296,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,830,709 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 922 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,600 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them