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Acute liver failure complication of brucellosis infection: a case report and review of the literature

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, March 2018
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Title
Acute liver failure complication of brucellosis infection: a case report and review of the literature
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13256-018-1576-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julio César García Casallas, Walter Villalobos Monsalve, Sara Consuelo Arias Villate, Ingrid Marisol Fino Solano

Abstract

Brucellosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses worldwide. It can affect any organ system, particularly the gastrointestinal system, but there is no report of acute liver failure as a brucellosis complication. We present a case of acute liver failure secondary to brucellosis infection. A 75-year-old Hispanic man presented to a University Hospital in Chía, Colombia, with a complaint of 15 days of fatigue, weakness, decreased appetite, epigastric abdominal pain, jaundice, and 10 kg weight loss. On examination in an emergency room, abdomen palpation was normal with hepatosplenomegaly and the results of a liver function test were elevated. The diagnosis of brucellosis was confirmed by epidemiological contact and positive Rose Bengal agglutination with negative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay immunoglobulin M for Brucella. He was then treated with doxycycline plus trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, with a favorable clinical outcome. The clinical presentation of brucellosis can be very imprecise because it can affect any organ system; however, there is no report of acute liver failure as a brucellosis complication. This is the first reported case in the Colombian literature of acute liver failure due to brucellosis. We found this case to be of interest because it could be taken into account for diagnosis in future appearances and we described adequate treatment and actions to be taken at presentation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Researcher 2 5%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 12 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 19%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 8%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 12 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2018.
All research outputs
#10,095,350
of 12,620,777 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#1,141
of 2,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#205,089
of 273,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#1
of 1 outputs
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