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Antibody levels to recombinant VAR2CSA domains vary with Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia, gestational age, and gravidity, but do not predict pregnancy outcomes

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, March 2018
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

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76 Mendeley
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Title
Antibody levels to recombinant VAR2CSA domains vary with Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia, gestational age, and gravidity, but do not predict pregnancy outcomes
Published in
Malaria Journal, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2258-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michal Fried, Jonathan D. Kurtis, Bruce Swihart, Robert Morrison, Sunthorn Pond-Tor, Amadou Barry, Youssoufa Sidibe, Sekouba Keita, Almahamoudou Mahamar, Naissem Andemel, Oumar Attaher, Adama B. Dembele, Kadidia B. Cisse, Bacary S. Diarra, Moussa B. Kanoute, David L. Narum, Alassane Dicko, Patrick E. Duffy

Abstract

Maternal malaria is a tropical scourge associated with poor pregnancy outcomes. Women become resistant to Plasmodium falciparum pregnancy malaria as they acquire antibodies to the variant surface antigen VAR2CSA, a leading vaccine candidate. Because malaria infection may increase VAR2CSA antibody levels and thereby confound analyses of immune protection, gravidity-dependent changes in antibody levels during and after infection, and the effect of VAR2CSA antibodies on pregnancy outcomes were evaluated. Pregnant women enrolled in a longitudinal cohort study of mother-infant pairs in Ouelessebougou, Mali provided plasma samples at enrollment, gestational week 30-32, and delivery. Antibody levels to VAR2CSA domains were measured using a multiplex bead-based assay. Antibody levels to VAR2CSA were higher in multigravidae than primigravidae. Malaria infection was associated with increased antibody levels to VAR2CSA domains. In primigravidae but not in secundigravidae or multigravidae, antibodies levels sharply declined after an infection. A relationship between any VAR2CSA antibody specificity and protection from adverse pregnancy outcomes was not detected. During malaria infection, primigravidae acquire short-lived antibodies. The lack of an association between VAR2CSA domain antibody reactivity and improved pregnancy outcomes suggests that the recombinant proteins may not present native epitopes targeted by protective antibodies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 76 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 14%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 4%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 25 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 21%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 28 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2018.
All research outputs
#10,814,769
of 18,844,683 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#3,115
of 5,016 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,186
of 289,581 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,844,683 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,016 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,581 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them