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Airway surface liquid from smokers promotes bacterial growth and biofilm formation via iron-lactoferrin imbalance

Overview of attention for article published in Respiratory Research, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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12 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Airway surface liquid from smokers promotes bacterial growth and biofilm formation via iron-lactoferrin imbalance
Published in
Respiratory Research, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12931-018-0743-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luis G. Vargas Buonfiglio, Jennifer A. Borcherding, Mark Frommelt, Gavin J. Parker, Bryce Duchman, Oriana G. Vanegas Calderón, Ruth Fernandez-Ruiz, Julio E. Noriega, Elizabeth A. Stone, Alicia K. Gerke, Joseph Zabner, Alejandro P. Comellas

Abstract

Smoking is a leading cause of respiratory infections worldwide. Tobacco particulate matter disrupts iron homeostasis in the lungs and increases the iron content in the airways of smokers. The airway epithelia secrete lactoferrin to quench iron required for bacteria to proliferate and cause lung infections. We hypothesized that smokers would have increased bacterial growth and biofilm formation via iron lactoferrin imbalance. We collected bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from non-smokers and smokers. We challenged these samples using a standard inoculum of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and quantified bacterial growth and biofilm formation. We measured both iron and lactoferrin in the samples. We investigated the effect of supplementing non-smoker BAL with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or ferric chloride and the effect of supplementing smoker BAL with lactoferrin on bacterial growth and biofilm formation. BAL from smokers had increased bacterial growth and biofilm formation compared to non-smokers after both S. aureus and P. aeruginosa challenge. In addition, we found that samples from smokers had a higher iron to lactoferrin ratio. Supplementing the BAL of non-smokers with cigarette smoke extract and ferric chloride increased bacterial growth. Conversely, supplementing the BAL of smokers with lactoferrin had a concentration-dependent decrease in bacterial growth and biofilm formation. Cigarette smoking produces factors which increase bacterial growth and biofilm formation in the BAL. We propose that smoking disrupts the iron-to-lactoferrin in the airways. This finding offers a new avenue for potential therapeutic interventions to prevent respiratory infections in smokers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 9 24%
Unknown 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 16%
Chemistry 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 13 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 March 2018.
All research outputs
#2,718,683
of 15,922,425 outputs
Outputs from Respiratory Research
#318
of 2,013 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,622
of 280,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Respiratory Research
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,425 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,013 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,716 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them