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CAMKs support development of acute myeloid leukemia

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Hematology & Oncology, February 2018
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Title
CAMKs support development of acute myeloid leukemia
Published in
Journal of Hematology & Oncology, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13045-018-0574-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xunlei Kang, Changhao Cui, Chen Wang, Guojin Wu, Heyu Chen, Zhigang Lu, Xiaoli Chen, Li Wang, Jie Huang, Huimin Geng, Meng Zhao, Zhengshan Chen, Markus Müschen, Huan-You Wang, Cheng Cheng Zhang

Abstract

We recently identified the human leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor B2 (LILRB2) and its mouse ortholog-paired Ig-like receptor (PirB) as receptors for several angiopoietin-like proteins (Angptls). We also demonstrated that PirB is important for the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but exactly how an inhibitory receptor such as PirB can support cancer development is intriguing. Here, we showed that the activation of Ca (2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CAMKs) is coupled with PirB signaling in AML cells. High expression of CAMKs is associated with a poor overall survival probability in patients with AML. Knockdown of CAMKI or CAMKIV decreased human acute leukemia development in vitro and in vivo. Mouse AML cells that are defective in PirB signaling had decreased activation of CAMKs, and the forced expression of CAMK partially rescued the PirB-defective phenotype in the MLL-AF9 AML mouse model. The inhibition of CAMK kinase activity or deletion of CAMKIV significantly slowed AML development and decreased the AML stem cell activity. We also found that CAMKIV acts through the phosphorylation of one of its well-known target (CREB) in AML cells. CAMKs are essential for the growth of human and mouse AML. The inhibition of CAMK signaling may become an effective strategy for treating leukemia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 29%
Other 2 12%
Researcher 2 12%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Engineering 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2022.
All research outputs
#19,798,472
of 22,237,531 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Hematology & Oncology
#1,010
of 1,160 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#262,695
of 299,352 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Hematology & Oncology
#1
of 1 outputs
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