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Changes in the equine fecal microbiota associated with the use of systemic antimicrobial drugs

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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87 Dimensions

Readers on

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143 Mendeley
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Title
Changes in the equine fecal microbiota associated with the use of systemic antimicrobial drugs
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12917-015-0335-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcio C Costa, Henry R Stämpfli, Luis G Arroyo, Emma Allen-Vercoe, Roberta G Gomes, J Weese

Abstract

BackgroundThe intestinal tract is a rich and complex environment and its microbiota has been shown to have an important role in health and disease in the host. Several factors can cause disruption of the normal intestinal microbiota, including antimicrobial therapy, which is an important cause of diarrhea in horses. This study aimed to characterize changes in the fecal bacterial populations of healthy horses associated with the administration of frequently used antimicrobial drugs.ResultsTwenty-four adult mares were assigned to receive procaine penicillin intramuscularly (IM), ceftiofur sodium IM, trimethoprim sulfadiazine (TMS) orally or to a control group. Treatment was given for 5 consecutive days and fecal samples were collected before drug administration (Day 1), at the end of treatment (Days 5), and on Days 14 and 30 of the trial. High throughput sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene was performed using an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. Significant changes of population structure and community membership were observed after the use of all drugs. TMS caused the most marked changes on fecal microbiota even at higher taxonomic levels including a significant decrease of richness and diversity. Those changes were mainly due to a drastic decrease of Verrucomicrobia, specifically the ¿5 genus incertae sedis¿. Changes in structure and membership caused by antimicrobial administration were specific for each drug and may be predictable. Twenty-five days after the end of treatment, bacterial profiles were more similar to pre-treatment patterns indicating a recovery from changes caused by antimicrobial administration, but differences were still evident, especially regarding community membership.ConclusionsThe use of systemic antimicrobials leads to changes in the intestinal microbiota, with different and specific responses to different antimicrobials. All antimicrobials tested here had some impact on the microbiota, but TMS significantly reduced bacterial species richness and diversity and had the greatest apparent impact on population structure, specifically targeting members of the Verrucomicrobia phylum.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 143 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 138 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 13%
Student > Master 17 12%
Student > Bachelor 15 10%
Other 13 9%
Other 27 19%
Unknown 28 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 46 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 3%
Other 14 10%
Unknown 32 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2021.
All research outputs
#3,887,668
of 19,790,383 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#261
of 2,692 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,531
of 312,641 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#4
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,790,383 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,692 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 312,641 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.