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Obesity as disruptor of the female fertility

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 770)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
108 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
476 Mendeley
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Title
Obesity as disruptor of the female fertility
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12958-018-0336-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erica Silvestris, Giovanni de Pergola, Raffaele Rosania, Giuseppe Loverro

Abstract

Both obesity and overweight are increasing worldwide and have detrimental influences on several human body functions including the reproductive health. In particular, obese women undergo perturbations of the 'hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis', and frequently suffer of menstrual dysfunction leading to anovulation and infertility. Besides the hormone disorders and subfertility that are common in the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), in obesity the adipocytes act as endocrine organ. The adipose tissue indeed, releases a number of bioactive molecules, namely adipokines, that variably interact with multiple molecular pathways of insulin resistance, inflammation, hypertension, cardiovascular risk, coagulation, and oocyte differentiation and maturation. Moreover, endometrial implantation and other reproductive functions are affected in obese women with complications including delayed conceptions, increased miscarriage rate, reduced outcomes in assisted conception treatments.On the contrary, weight loss programs through lifestyle modification in obese women, have been proven to restore menstrual cyclicity and ovulation and improve the likelihood of conception.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 476 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 476 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 96 20%
Student > Master 63 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 44 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 8%
Researcher 37 8%
Other 63 13%
Unknown 134 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 129 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 54 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 38 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 6%
Social Sciences 15 3%
Other 63 13%
Unknown 150 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 58. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2021.
All research outputs
#490,895
of 19,046,601 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#20
of 770 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,222
of 338,272 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,046,601 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 770 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,272 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them