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Gender differences in the associations between age trends of social media interaction and well-being among 10-15 year olds in the UK

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 12,150)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
55 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
47 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
71 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
223 Mendeley
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Title
Gender differences in the associations between age trends of social media interaction and well-being among 10-15 year olds in the UK
Published in
BMC Public Health, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5220-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cara L. Booker, Yvonne J. Kelly, Amanda Sacker

Abstract

Adolescents are among the highest consumers of social media while research has shown that their well-being decreases with age. The temporal relationship between social media interaction and well-being is not well established. The aim of this study was to examine whether the changes in social media interaction and two well-being measures are related across ages using parallel growth models. Data come from five waves of the youth questionnaire, 10-15 years, of the Understanding Society, the UK Household Longitudinal Study (pooled n = 9859). Social media interaction was assessed through daily frequency of chatting on social websites. Well-being was measured by happiness with six domains of life and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Findings suggest gender differences in the relationship between interacting on social media and well-being. There were significant correlations between interacting on social media and well-being intercepts and between social media interaction and well-being slopes among females. Additionally higher social media interaction at age 10 was associated with declines in well-being thereafter for females, but not for males. Results were similar for both measures of well-being. High levels of social media interaction in early adolescence have implications for well-being in later adolescence, particularly for females. The lack of an association among males suggests other factors might be associated with their reduction in well-being with age. These findings contribute to the debate on causality and may inform future policy and interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 47 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 223 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 223 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 39 17%
Student > Master 32 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 7%
Student > Postgraduate 14 6%
Other 37 17%
Unknown 59 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 51 23%
Social Sciences 32 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 6%
Arts and Humanities 6 3%
Other 35 16%
Unknown 71 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 504. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 December 2020.
All research outputs
#28,243
of 18,038,980 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#31
of 12,150 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#990
of 289,694 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,038,980 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,150 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,694 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them