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A survey of knowledge, attitude, and practices of private retail pharmacies staff in tuberculosis care: study from Dera Ismail Khan City, Pakistan

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, March 2018
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4 tweeters

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45 Mendeley
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Title
A survey of knowledge, attitude, and practices of private retail pharmacies staff in tuberculosis care: study from Dera Ismail Khan City, Pakistan
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40545-018-0134-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tehmina Mustafa, Yasir Shahzad, Ayyaz Kiani

Abstract

In order to engage pharmacies in tuberculosis (TB) care, a survey was conducted in the Dera Ismail (DI) Khan City of the Khyber Pakhtoon Khwa province, Pakistan. The objectives were to; 1) characterize the retail pharmacies; 2) determine knowledge of the staff on various aspects of pulmonary TB; 3) determine practices related to the sale of anti-TB drugs, and referrals of presumptive TB patient, and willingness to participate in the National Tuberculosis Control Programme's (NTP) Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course (DOTS) strategy. A cross-sectional survey was conducted by using a structured questionnaire to collect data from pharmacy staff at all the private retail pharmacies of the DI khan city. All the interviewed staff (n = 82) were males, only 38% had formal training as pharmacist (5%) or as a pharmacy assistant (33%). Pharmacies established for a longer period were better staffed and had high customer load. About 92% of the interviewed staff knew that persistent cough is a symptom for TB, 82% knew that TB is diagnosed by examination of sputum. Almost 66% of the pharmacy staff did not know multi-drug resistance TB as a consequence of improper treatment. Those with formal training and longer experience in retail pharmacy had better knowledge of various aspects of TB as compared to the staff with no formal pharmacy training and lesser experience (p < 0.01). Only 57% were aware of NTP while only 30% had heard of the DOTS strategy. All reported sale of first-line TB drugs as fixed dose combinations. The majority (80%) referred presumptive TB patients to chest physicians and no patient was referred to the NTP. Nearly 83% of the interviewed staff was willing to be involved in TB control efforts by getting training and referring patients to the DOTS facility. There was shortage of professionally qualified and female staff in private retail pharmacies. Knowledge of professionally qualified staff about TB seemed sufficient to identify presumptive TB patients; however, their knowledge about NTP and DOTS was poor, and referral practices to NTP and DOTS centers were suboptimal. Majority of staff was willing to be involved in TB control efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 11 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 11 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 16%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Sports and Recreations 2 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 15 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2018.
All research outputs
#8,986,571
of 15,922,425 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#159
of 245 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,910
of 281,102 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,425 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 245 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,102 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them