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Factors associated with human West Nile virus infection in Ontario: a generalized linear mixed modelling approach

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

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11 news outlets
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3 X users

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16 Dimensions

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52 Mendeley
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Title
Factors associated with human West Nile virus infection in Ontario: a generalized linear mixed modelling approach
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12879-018-3052-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shruti Mallya, Beate Sander, Marie-Hélène Roy-Gagnon, Monica Taljaard, Ann Jolly, Manisha A. Kulkarni

Abstract

West Nile Virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen that has become established in North America. Risk for human infection varies geographically in accordance with climate and population factors. Though often asymptomatic, human WNV infection can cause febrile illness or, rarely, neurologic disease. WNV has become a public health concern in Canada since its introduction in 2001. To identify predictors of human WNV incidence at the public health unit (PHU) level in Ontario, Canada, we combined data on environmental and population characteristics of PHUs with historical mosquito and human surveillance records from 2002 to 2013. We examined the associations between annual WNV incidence and monthly climate indices (e.g. minimum and maximum temperature, average precipitation), land cover (e.g. deciduous forest, water), population structure (e.g. age and sex composition) and the annual percentage of WNV-positive mosquito pools from 2002 to 2013. We then developed a generalized linear mixed model with a Poisson distribution adjusting for spatial autocorrelation and repeat measures. Further to this, to examine potential 'early season' predictors of WNV incidence in a given year, we developed a model based on winter and spring monthly climate indices. Several climate indices, including mean minimum temperature (oC) in February (RR = 1.58, CI: [1.42, 1.75]), and the annual percentage of WNV-positive mosquito pools (RR = 1.07, CI: [1.04, 1.11]) were significantly associated with human WNV incidence at the PHU level. Higher winter minimum temperatures were also strongly associated with annual WNV incidence in the 'early season' model (e.g. February minimum temperature (RR = 1.91, CI: [1.73, 2.12]). Our study demonstrates that early season temperature and precipitation indices, in addition to the percentage of WNV-positive mosquito pools in a given area, may assist in predicting the likelihood of a more severe human WNV season in southern regions of Ontario, where WNV epidemics occur sporadically.

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X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 23%
Student > Master 10 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 15 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 12%
Environmental Science 6 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 4%
Other 11 21%
Unknown 18 35%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 90. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 July 2018.
All research outputs
#425,446
of 23,881,329 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#105
of 7,931 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,476
of 332,098 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 137 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,881,329 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,931 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 332,098 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 137 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.