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Phages infecting Faecalibacterium prausnitzii belong to novel viral genera that help to decipher intestinal viromes

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
33 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
48 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
108 Mendeley
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Title
Phages infecting Faecalibacterium prausnitzii belong to novel viral genera that help to decipher intestinal viromes
Published in
Microbiome, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40168-018-0452-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffrey K. Cornuault, Marie-Agnès Petit, Mahendra Mariadassou, Leandro Benevides, Elisabeth Moncaut, Philippe Langella, Harry Sokol, Marianne De Paepe

Abstract

Viral metagenomic studies have suggested a role for bacteriophages in intestinal dysbiosis associated with several human diseases. However, interpretation of viral metagenomic studies is limited by the lack of knowledge of phages infecting major human gut commensal bacteria, such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a bacterial symbiont repeatedly found depleted in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. In particular, no complete genomes of phages infecting F. prausnitzii are present in viral databases. We identified 18 prophages in 15 genomes of F. prausnitzii, used comparative genomics to define eight phage clades, and annotated the genome of the type phage of each clade. For two of the phages, we studied prophage induction in vitro and in vivo in mice. Finally, we aligned reads from already published viral metagenomic data onto the newly identified phages. We show that each phage clade represents a novel viral genus and that a surprisingly large fraction of them (10 of the 18 phages) codes for a diversity-generating retroelement, which could contribute to their adaptation to the digestive tract environment. We obtained either experimental or in silico evidence of activity for at least one member of each genus. In addition, four of these phages are either significantly more prevalent or more abundant in stools of IBD patients than in those of healthy controls. Since IBD patients generally have less F. prausnitzii in their microbiota than healthy controls, the higher prevalence or abundance of some of its phages may indicate that they are activated during disease. This in turn suggests that phages could trigger or aggravate F. prausnitzii depletion in patients. Our results show that prophage detection in sequenced strains of the microbiota can usefully complement viral metagenomic studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 33 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 108 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 20%
Student > Master 20 19%
Researcher 14 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 6%
Other 15 14%
Unknown 23 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 26 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 14 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 5%
Computer Science 3 3%
Other 9 8%
Unknown 32 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 April 2021.
All research outputs
#966,571
of 19,293,994 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#326
of 1,168 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,791
of 292,810 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,293,994 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,168 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,810 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them