↓ Skip to main content

Efficacy and safety of artemether–lumefantrine, artesunate–amodiaquine, and dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in three provinces in Angola…

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 5,381)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
31 news outlets
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
53 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Efficacy and safety of artemether–lumefantrine, artesunate–amodiaquine, and dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in three provinces in Angola, 2017
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2290-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth Davlantes, Pedro Rafael Dimbu, Carolina Miguel Ferreira, Maria Florinda Joao, Dilunvuidi Pode, Jacinto Félix, Edgar Sanhangala, Benjamin Nieto Andrade, Samaly dos Santos Souza, Eldin Talundzic, Venkatachalam Udhayakumar, Chantelle Owens, Eliane Mbounga, Lubbe Wiesner, Eric S. Halsey, José Franco Martins, Filomeno Fortes, Mateusz M. Plucinski

Abstract

The Angolan government recommends three artemisinin-based combinations for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria: artemether-lumefantrine (AL), artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ), and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP). Due to the threat of emerging anti-malarial drug resistance, it is important to periodically monitor the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). This study evaluated these medications' therapeutic efficacy in Benguela, Lunda Sul, and Zaire Provinces. Enrollment occurred between March and July 2017. Study participants were children with P. falciparum monoinfection from each provincial capital. Participants received a 3-day course of a quality-assured artemisinin-based combination and were monitored for 28 (AL and ASAQ arms) or 42 days (DP arm). Each ACT was assessed in two provinces. The primary study endpoints were: (1) follow-up without complications and (2) failure to respond to treatment or development of recurrent P. falciparum infection. Parasites from each patient experiencing recurrent infection were genotyped to differentiate new infection from recrudescence of persistent parasitaemia. These parasites were also analysed for molecular markers associated with ACT resistance. Of 608 children enrolled in the study, 540 (89%) reached a primary study endpoint. Parasitaemia was cleared within 3 days of medication administration in all participants, and no early treatment failures were observed. After exclusion of reinfections, the corrected efficacy of AL was 96% (91-100%, 95% confidence interval) in Zaire and 97% (93-100%) in Lunda Sul. The corrected efficacy of ASAQ was 100% (97-100%) in Benguela and 93% (88-99%) in Zaire. The corrected efficacy of DP was 100% (96-100%) in Benguela and 100% in Lunda Sul. No mutations associated with artemisinin resistance were identified in the pfk13 gene in the 38 cases of recurrent P. falciparum infection. All 33 treatment failures in the AL and ASAQ arms carried pfmdr1 or pfcrt mutations associated with lumefantrine and amodiaquine resistance, respectively, on day of failure. AL, ASAQ, and DP continue to be efficacious against P. falciparum malaria in these provinces of Angola. Rapid parasite clearance and the absence of genetic evidence of artemisinin resistance are consistent with full susceptibility to artemisinin derivatives. Periodic monitoring of in vivo drug efficacy remains a priority routine activity for Angola.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 79 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 15%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 13 16%
Unknown 16 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 16%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 20 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 250. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2022.
All research outputs
#110,032
of 21,744,520 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#13
of 5,381 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,056
of 299,159 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,744,520 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,381 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,159 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them