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Progranulin in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and neuroinflammation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, February 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
193 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
186 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Progranulin in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and neuroinflammation
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, February 2007
DOI 10.1186/1742-2094-4-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zeshan Ahmed, Ian RA Mackenzie, Michael L Hutton, Dennis W Dickson

Abstract

Progranulin (PGRN) is a pleiotropic protein that has gained the attention of the neuroscience community with recent discoveries of mutations in the gene for PGRN that cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Pathogenic mutations in PGRN result in null alleles, and the disease is likely the result of haploinsufficiency. Little is known about the normal function of PGRN in the central nervous system apart from a role in brain development. It is expressed by microglia and neurons. In the periphery, PGRN is involved in wound repair and inflammation. High PGRN expression has been associated with more aggressive growth of various tumors. The properties of full length PGRN are distinct from those of proteolytically derived peptides, referred to as granulins (GRNs). While PGRN has trophic properties, GRNs are more akin to inflammatory mediators such as cytokines. Loss of the neurotrophic properties of PGRN may play a role in selective neuronal degeneration in FTLD, but neuroinflammation may also be important. Gene expression studies suggest that PGRN is up-regulated in a variety of neuroinflammatory conditions, and increased PGRN expression by microglia may play a pivotal role in the response to brain injury, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 186 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Spain 1 <1%
Philippines 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 181 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 24%
Researcher 30 16%
Student > Bachelor 30 16%
Student > Master 23 12%
Professor 12 6%
Other 27 15%
Unknown 20 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 21%
Neuroscience 31 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 28 15%
Psychology 7 4%
Other 13 7%
Unknown 25 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2021.
All research outputs
#1,410,355
of 21,542,809 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#119
of 2,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,995
of 325,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,542,809 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,485 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 325,720 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them